College Senate Bulletin

State University of New York at Geneseo

College of Arts and Sciences

 

Correspondence to Dennis Showers, School of Education, South 222C, showers@geneseo.edu, 245-5264

Note: Page numbers indicate pages as per the paper copy of the Bulletins.

 

Bulletin No. 3


Bulletin No. 3


Pages 20-33


November 13, 2009


Contents


Topic Page


College Senate Meeting Agenda, 11/17/09 21

College Senate Meeting Minutes of 9/22/09 22

College Senate Meeting Minutes of 10/23/09 25

Faculty Affairs Committee Meeting Minutes of 10/27/09 28

Student Affairs Committee Meeting Minutes of 10/27/09 29

Undergraduate Curriculum Committee Meeting Minutes of 10/27/09 31

UCC Proposals for Senate meeting on 11/17/09 32









Agenda for Senate Meeting on November 17, 2009

Call to Order

Adoption of the Agenda

Adoption of the Minutes


Senate Reports

President Christopher Dahl

Provost Carol Long

Chair Dennis Showers

Vice Chair Chris Leary

Past-Chair David Granger

Treasurer Gregg Hartvigsen

University Faculty Senator Maria Lima

Vice President, Student Assoc. Nicholas Kaasik


Reports of the Standing Committees of the Senate

Undergraduate Curricula Robert Owens

First Reading

New Courses (Found on CSB 3, page 32)

ANTH 237, Art and Material Culture

COMN 349, Advanced Issues in Personal and Professional Communication

CSCI 390, Topics in Computer Science

New Core Courses (Found on CSB 6, March 17, 2009)

HIST 111, World History
HIST 163, African American History to 1877
HIST 164, African-American History from 1877

HIST 267, Women and U.S. Social Movements (Found on CSB 9, April 1, 2008)

Course Revisions (Found on CSB 3, page 33)

HIST 322, German Society and Politics since 1945

PLSC 322, German Society and Politics since 1945

Course Deletions (Description included in Course Revisions, CSB 3, page 33)

HIST 229, German Society and Politics since 1945

PLSC 229, German Society and Politics since 1945


Second Reading

Course Revision (Found on CSB 2, page 10)

PHIL 209, Phenomenology and Existentialism

PHIL 397 Seminar: Major Problems

PHIL 398 Seminar: Major Philosophers

Program Revision (Found on CSB 2, page 11)

Minor in Biology

Undergraduate Policies Leigh O’Brien

Graduate Academic Affairs Susan Salmon

Student Affairs Justin Behrend

Faculty Affairs James Bearden


Old Business

New Business

Adjournment


Minutes College Senate Meeting

22 September 2009


Present: C. Adams, J. Aimers, J. Allen, J. Bearden, C. Dahl, S. Derne, D. DeZarn, J. Dolce, J. Elmore, C. Filice, C. Freeman, C. Geiger, K. Gentry, W. Gohlman, D. Granger, A. Gu, K. Hannam, D. Hanrahan, W. Harrison, G. Hartvigsen, A. Herman, S. Iyer, M. Klotz, C. Kreutter, A. Lauricella, C. Leary, M. Lima, M. Liwanag, J. Lovett, D. MacKenzie, G. Marcus, C. Matthews, B. Morgan, L. O’Brien, B. Owens, P. Radosh, A. Steinhauer, M. Stolee, S. Stubblefield, L. Spencer,

Guests: K. Muller, T. Atsushi, J. Nathanson, N. Kaasik, B. Semel, A. Kuntz, A. Pridmore


Call to Order

Chair Showers called the Senate to order at 4:00 and welcomed everyone back for a new Senate year.


Adoption of the Agenda

The agenda of September 22, 2009 (College Senate Bulletin #1, p. 2) was adopted from the floor with no objections or corrections.

Adoption of the Minutes
The minutes of the April 21, 2009 (College Senate Bulletin #8, pp. 111-113) was adopted from the floor with no objections or corrections.


Senate Reports


President’s Report – C. Dahl


  1. No dramatic things to report since his 8/29/09 College address when he reported on the state of the College. There is little to report on the state budget. Revenue signs are looking better and there will be a special meeting on budget cuts in September and no one knows what will happen. The President has responded to all 6 reports of the 6 Big Ideas and his responses can be found on the Geneseo wiki. The President is very grateful to those serving on the task forces, members of the Strategic Planning Group and the College Budget office. Subject to advice from the Senate Executive Committee leadership, a special meeting of the College will take place to provide a detailed report of where we are with the current budget with results being shared with the College community as rapidly as possible.

  2. Very pleased with the Committee on Community & Diversity as they become active again. They will strive to revamp Deliberative Dialogs and have created a pilot project called “Real World Geneseo” which will focus on all aspects of a liberal education and diversity in the community. Even when diversified we need to keep effort in building community and remembering the real need to create an excellent undergraduate, faculty and college community. We are always full speed ahead on this front.

  3. Major good news to report on Advancement. The College has $9 million plus $85,000 now committed to its upcoming capital campaign. We are doing much more to bring back alumni with the upcoming Homecoming, an exciting parent’s weekend, a celebration of the sciences and a recent physics reunion. Thanks to our faculty for providing lectures and such for our alumni visits – this assists us in our resources.

  4. SUNY Chancellor Zimpher has completed her tours of the 64 campuses. She will be creating a ‘moveable’ group of 200 people for developing a strategic plan.


Provost’s Report – C. Long


Senate Chair Showers gave a very warm welcome to the Provost.


Provost Long thanked everyone for welcoming her so kindly and enjoyed meeting many wonderful people at the various receptions. She is very excited to be here.


  1. Sabbatical Proposals are due to the Provost Office on or by 10/15/09.

  2. Several new opportunities to be aware of:

  • Change in membership requirements for the Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR).

  • Institutional mission --- keeping small colleges on the crest of the technology wave.

  • New meeting software available in the Library: GotoConference allows faculty to participate in conferences on line rather than actually traveling to conference for participation.

  1. Provost will be putting together a committee for the Middle States Accreditation that will be coming within the next few years.


Chairs’ Report - D. Showers


  1. Chair Dennis Showers reported current senate membership stands at:

  1. 88 members - 2 departments missing, 1 grad student missing, 1 admin senator missing and all undergrad student appointments have been made.

  2. Quorum = 45

  3. Special meeting may be called by 9 members.

  4. All committee appointments have been made.

  5. Bill Gohlman has accepted appointment as Parliamentarian.

  1. Donations to the Senate fund which serves as a social function and used for:

  • Death in family or something with fellow-colleagues.

  • Small grants through the College Senate for faculty which cover research projects.

  • Members of the Executive Committee were asked to donate and all members did so and now I ask that all members of the Senate please donate. Contact G. Hartvigsen or the Geneseo Foundation.

  1. Constitutional Changes – Improve governance system to faculty Constitution. The Chair intends to make some clerical changes without having to go through the Constitutional amendment process. For example:

  • Article IV, Section 5 – Student Services = Student and Campus Life

  • Article X, Section 3 – SPAG -> SPG

Minor changes/clarifications (no change intent):

  • Article V, Section 1 – Chair of the Faculty. The elected offices of the faculty shall be the Chair, Vice Chair, Secretary and Treasurer.

  • Article X, Section 2 of the Board of Trustees policies states, “The chief administrative officer of the college shall be the chair of the faculty of each college. Each college faculty may provide for the selection of its presiding officer, in a manner to be specified in college faculty bylaws.” Clarification in for the title of Chair, of the Senate, as Presiding Officer.

  • Article III, Section 1.b. – elect University Faculty Senator and alternate.

Strategic Planning Advisory Group:

  • Article X, 3, a. 4. – committee be represented by “four teaching faculty”

  • Article X, 3, b.1 – sets up processes for selecting and replacing 3 members. Section (b): Other than the initial one and two year terms, faculty terms will be for three years.

Substantial changes which will require full amendment process:

  • Add CAAC

  • Change Committee on Nominations to Committee on Nominations and Elections

  • State Chairs must be teaching faculty.


Steve Derne (Sociology) What are the results of departments’ recommendations on the roles and rewards task force final report? Chair Showers stated that the Senate recommended consideration of the proposed form which was sent on to the President. President Dahl said his recommendation was to have the decisions of the report deferred until the arrival of the new Provost since it is primarily an Academic issue. V. Farmer (Political Science) is this the H-form? Chair Showers said it’s the H-2.


Vice Chair - Chris Leary

Currently accepting nominations for the following awards:

  • Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching

  • Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Professional Service

  • Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Librarianship

  • Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Scholarship and Creative Activities

  • Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Faculty Service

  • Distinguished Teaching Professor

  • Distinguished Service Professor

  • Distinguished Professor

  • Distinguished Librarian


Deadline for nominations is Friday, September 25, 2009.


J. Lewis (Biology) asked if there was a place where we can see former nominees and C. Leary said he could get a list and C. Geiger (Chemistry) suggested looking on the TLC webpage under Awards.


Past Chair – David Granger

He’s working with CIT to make additional enhancements to the voting process and also on campus governance.


Secretary ReportBrian Morgan

No report.


Treasurer Report – Gregg Hartvigsen

Balance of $391.60 in account. He will be sending an e-mail on how one can participate. B. Morgan (Education) asked if donation is tax deductible and G. Hartvigsen responded ‘yes.’


University Faculty Senate Report – Maria Lima

No report.


Student Association Report – Nick Kaasik

There is full undergrad student senator representation consisting of 9 different majors.


Undergraduate Curricula Report – Bob Owens

The first meeting will be held on Tuesday, 9/29/09 at 4:00 p.m. in Sturges 105.


Undergraduate Policies – Leigh O’Brien

No report.


Graduate Academic AffairsSusan Salmon

Susan Salmon - absent. No report.


Student Affairs – Justin O’Brien

No report.


Faculty Affairs – James Bearden

The first meeting will be next Tuesday; e-mail has been sent to all committee members.


Old Business

No report.


New Business

No Report


Adjournment

At 4:35 p.m.




College Senate Meeting Minutes

October 20, 2009


Call to order

Chair Showers called the Senate to order at 4:32.


Adoption of the Agenda (CSB #2, page 10)

The agenda was adopted without corrections or additions.

Adoption of the Minutes
The minutes of the September 22, 2009 have not been published yet.


Senate Reports


Provost’s Report – C. Long

  • In response to the President’s budget report, the Provost stated she is still learning the SUNY budget system.

Over the past few weeks there have been many groups on campus where the presence of our Geneseo Foundation was represented, and to remember that the Foundation serves as another area of funding.

  • Assistant Provost for Undergraduate Education, Nancy Willie-Schiff, was on campus today and thanks to all who assisted with showing her around.

  • Will be attending her first CAO meeting next week and with her talk with Nancy Willie-Schiff, Provost Long is looking ahead to what the system could bring to areas such as International Education and Sponsored Research. If you have any areas you would like her to cover please let her know.

Committee Updates:

  • Sabbatical applications have been received in her office. The Professional Leave Review committee will be meeting soon.

  • The Provost is re-convening the Technology Advisory Committee in hopes to have a little money for technology requests.

  • David Parfit in the TLC is developing a faculty mentoring program.

  • Provost is working her way through the report of the Strategic Planning Group with the members of the 6 Big Ideas task force.


Chairs’ Report - D. Showers


General Education Replacements

Humanities – Edward van Vliet

Professional Programs – Kelly Keegan


At-Large Faculty

  • According to HR there are 265 Teaching faculty and Librarians of which 202 have 6 or more years with the College (76%).



  • There are to be 18 At-Large Senators.



  • At-Large Senators are to be apportioned according to the proportions of faculty six years or under vs. over six years.



  • The upshot of this is that 14 (13.72) of the At-Large Senators should be over six years and only 4 (there are six now) should be 6 or under.



  • We have three At-Large Senators (six years or under) who will be continuing through 2010-2011. Therefore in the Spring we will elect only one six years or younger and eight over six years.



Constitutional Editorial Changes

  • (Old) ARTICLE V: OFFICERS

Section 1: The elected officers of the Faculty shall be the Chair, the Vice Chair, the Secretary, the Treasurer, and the Immediate Past Chair. They shall also serve in these capacities for the College Senate.


  • (New) ARTICLE V: OFFICERS

Section 1: The elected officers of the College Senate shall be the Chair, the Vice Chair, the Secretary, the Treasurer, and the Immediate Past Chair. The Chair of the College Senate shall also serve as the Presiding Officer of the Faculty.


  • Article IV, section 5: “Student Services” changed to “Student and Campus Life”



  • Article X, section 3: “Strategic Planning Advisory Group” changed to “Strategic Planning Group”




Change Standing Committees of the College (Article X)


  • Research Council Subcommittees

Old: Student Grants Subcommittee, the Research Subcommittee, the Travel Subcommittee

New: Student Research and Travel Grants Subcommittee, the Faculty Research Subcommittee, the Faculty Travel Subcommittee


  • Add new Section 4: College Assessment Advisory Council

  1. Membership:

1. The following will be members by reason of office:

The Associate Provost responsible for Assessment who will Chair the Council

The Director of Budgets

The Director of Institutional Research

The Chair of the College Senate or designee

The Chair of Academic Affairs Program Assessment

The Chair of Administration & Finance Assessment or representative named by the Vice President

the Chair of Student and Campus Life Assessment or representative named by the Vice President



2. The Council shall have the following additional members:

One member of the Teaching Faculty elected to a 3-year term

One Student Representative appointed by the President to a 2 year term



  1. Functions:

The Council shall facilitate College-wide assessment seeing that each division of the College shall have an assessment process that will provide:

A review of assessment results from the units within the division

Constructive feedback to the units on their assessment plans

An annual report to the College Assessment Advisory Council that addresses College planning objectives as manifested within each division



The Council shall

Review annual reports from divisional assessment processes provided by the Vice Presidents to the Council

Send a summary report to the Strategic Planning group

Evaluate campus assessment procedures

Develop recommendations regarding the coordination of campus assessment and planning processes

Encourage the campus-wide use of evidence in programmatic decision-making

Organize assessment training and professional development across the campus

The Chair of the CAAC will be a non-voting member of the Strategic Planning Group and will operate as a liaison between the College Assessment Advisory Council and the Strategic Planning Group.


Vice Chair - Chris Leary

No report.


Past Chair – David Granger

No report.


Secretary ReportBrian Morgan

No report.


Treasurer Report – Gregg Hartvigsen

Balance of Senate Fund is $471.61 plus an additional $10 check recently received. All members of the Executive Committee have made a donation to the Senate Fund.


University Faculty Senate Report – Maria Lima

No report.


Student Association Report – Nick Kaasik

  • Will be presenting a discussion on Health Related Emergency Special Consideration/Medical Amnesty Policy at the next Student Affairs Committee meeting.

  • Student Budget Advocacy – requesting ALL students contact the governor, legislators and senators to advocate for no further cuts to the SUNY budget.


Questions:


Ren Vasiliev, GEOG: Can you explain the Medical Amnesty Policy

Nick Kaasik: the Medical Amnesty Policy will reduce the number of obstacles to seeking assistance in the event of an alcohol or drug related emergency. For example, if a student passes out and another student calls for help the student calling for help could face judicial action by the College with the Medical Amnesty Policy the student could attend the BASICS program and not face judicial action by the college.

Vasiliev: What is BASICS?

Kaasik: A meeting with counselors to discuss the dangers of drinking.


Undergraduate Curricula Report – Bob Owens

First Reading:
Course Revisions (CSB2, pp. 10-11):

  • PHIL 209, Phenomenology and Existentialism

  • PHIL 397 Seminar: Major Problems

  • PHIL 398 Seminar: Major Philosophers

Passed.

Program Revision (CSB 2, p. 11):

  • Minor in Biology

Passed.

The next meeting of the UCC will be Tuesday, 10/27/09 at 4:00 p.m. in Sturges 105.



Undergraduate Academic Policies, Core and Review – Leigh O’Brien


Graduate Academic AffairsSusan Salmon

No report.


Student Affairs – Justin O’Brien

No report.


Faculty Affairs – James Bearden

No report.

The next meeting will be next Tuesday, 10/27/09 at 4:00 p.m. in CU 225.


Old Business

No report.


New Business

No Report


Adjournment

At 4:52 p.m.


Minutes of the Faculty Affairs Committee

October 27, 2009


Present: C. Adams, J. Allen, J. Bearden, B. Colòn, S. Derné, D. DeZarn, A. Foley, Y. Massen,

D. McPherson, F. Sheikh, A. Sheldon, A. Steinhauer, B. Swoger

Excused: J. Lewis, M. Liwanag

Guest: K. McKeever, H. Waddy


Call to order:

J. Bearden called the meeting to order at 4:00 PM


Approval of the agenda

The Agenda was approved without corrections or additions

Approval of minutes

The Minutes of FAC Meeting, September 29, 2009 were approved.


S. Derné agreed to take notes for the minutes. This task will rotate to other members of the committee at later meetings.


Chair’s Report on the Executive Committee meeting and of a meeting with the Provost.

The Executive Committee and the Provost asked the FAC to consult with the Dean about the modifications of the block schedule that have been tried over the past year and that are planned for the future.

We agreed to invite the Dean to our next meeting on November 10, 2009 and to prepare a set of questions about the schedule that reflect the concerns raised by some members of the committee. The result of our discussion is listed below.


Fundamental principles the Dean’s office should consider in making a schedule

1) A disproportionate number of classes employ pedagogy that is inconsistent with 50- minute blocks. In the liberal arts context, many faculty teach through discussion, seminar-style, a practice that benefits from longer class periods. The Dean should consider the nature of courses taught in the college in balancing 75 minute and 50 minute classes.


2) Faculty and students believe classes that start at 8:00AM limit the learning of many students.


The meeting was adjourned about 5:00 PM


Respectfully submitted by Steve Derné and J. Bearden


Questions for the Dean

  1. Are classes mostly full in the over-represented time slots (10-2)?

  2. Are classes mostly full in the over-represented blocks (75 minute)?

  3. Many faculty do not lecture as such. They employ a variety of methods that are difficult to complete in a 50-minute class. Can the schedule provide sufficient 75-minute slots to accommodate these classroom styles?

  4. Do we know if the conflicts in scheduling derive mostly from 3-credit courses or from 4-credit courses or courses with labs or studios?

  5. Do we know if there are data supporting the contention that there is no substantial difference in student learning between an 8:30 AM start and an 8:00 or 8:05 start?

  6. Can you share the details of the SUNY memo on efficient use of facilities so faculty can consider other options consistent with its guidance?

  7. Do we know how many students have trouble, because of scheduling problems, meeting graduation requirements in four years?

  8. Are there ways to encourage more Friday classes without greatly reducing the number of 75-minute classes?

  9. How do classes in the arts, with longer studio time, fit into the proposed schedule?

  10. Do we know if conflicts arise more from blocks that conflict or a failure to schedule classes throughout the day and throughout the week?

  11. Is it possible to put moving the college hour on the table? Could the college hour be moved to evening? The college hour is particularly problematic for instructors in the arts.

  12. Can you tell us what has been done or is planned for the evaluation of the new schedule?

  13. Some faculty propose specific strategies for scheduling. How can we best communicate and discuss these proposals?

  14. How do you think you can facilitate faculty input into future scheduling decisions?


Minutes of the Student Affairs Committee Meeting

October 27, 2009

Present: Justin Behrend, Atsushi Tajima, Andrew Herman, Amanda Barbarello, Dayshawn Simmons, Tyler Ocon, Jeffery Nathanson, Derek Weng, Nicolas Kaasik, Kara Johnson, Patrick Rault, Chrisinna Geiger, Victoria Famer, Chi-Ming Tang, Charles Matthews

Justin Behrend opened the meeting at 4:00 p.m.

  • Chair’s Report

    1. Executive committee meeting approved the following issues for research

      • Registration and course availability issues

      • Accessibility and transportation issues

    2. Also charged the committee to review and discuss Dean Radosh’s proposal for moving more classes to MWF time blocks

      • Discussion regarding issue

        1. For many, an ideal is to group and minimize teaching days to allow for maximizing research days

        2. There appears to be an emphasis on the 2-day, 75 minute classes by faculty

        3. Many students (anecdotally) like to have Friday afternoons free

          1. Is it possible to make student preferences more explicit? Can consider running a paper or online survey

        4. It was noted that we should consider that learning is a five day, full day process – it is often better to have the schedule more spread out, both for teachers and students (regarding distribution of classes and tests)

          1. Many students noted the overlap of classes and scheduling conflicts created by it

          2. Some students avoid Friday classes for good reasons – e.g., Fridays are a good time for all day internship commitments or a time when sports teams leave town

  • Old Business

    1. None discussed

  • New Business

    1. Nick Kaasik – Medical Amnesty Proposal for a new policy

      • Considering new names

      • Need for a new policy

        1. Current policy requires that a student with a drinking incident that requires assistance will have the incident noted on their record and face possible judicial action

        2. Current policy discourages reporting possible medical emergencies related to drinking

      • New policy discussed – see attached handout

        1. Has been tested at some schools and does not appear to have increased the incidence of drinking

        2. Are trying to find ways to promote students calling to support an endangered student without anyone feeling like their future is in jeopardy

        3. Some issues to consider:

          1. Need to clarify proposed policy about who is calling for whom

          2. What if a student is found drunk by an RA and is reported?

            1. Clarify for on and off-duty RAs

          3. Clarify implications for unconscious students

          4. Does this promote people not being concerned about drinking and repeating the behavior?

            1. There are other “costs” associated with the endeavor that may discourage future behavior (e.g., ambulance, hospital costs)

            2. N. Kaasik noted that the primary purpose of this policy is to promote seeking medical support for the endangered student

            3. Further details can be implemented regarding appropriate steps for Dean of Students office to take

          5. How does affect University Police?

            1. DA is opposed though has a similar option for traffic tickets

            2. Currently, breaking a State law is a violation of code of conduct. VP Bonfiglio does not see College Council supporting this

              1. N. Kaasik noted that the College is voluntarily choosing to “punish” offenders beyond State laws, though this is not required


Meeting adjourned at 5:00 p.m.


Minutes of UCC Meeting for

4 p.m., Tuesday, October 27, 2009


Chair Bob Owens called the meeting to order at 4:01.


Present:

Members: B. Owens, R. Coloccia, J. Yee, M. Jensen, C. Park, B. Harrison, J. Kirkwood, J. Lovett, J. Aimes, B. Gohlman, R. Vasiliev, M. Stolee

Guests: M. Harrigan, D. Baldwin, and B. Goeckel


The revised agenda was adopted.


The minutes of the September 29, 2009 meeting were accepted.


I. New Business

New Courses

-ANTH 237 Art and Material Culture: Passed.

During the discussion of the course a general issue came up: should the new course description be included in the guide syllabus? The Committee will pass this on to the Dean’s Office for consideration.


-COMN 349: Advanced Issues in Personal and Professional Communication: Passed.

The Committee had questions about the rotation “once yearly.” Harrigan from COMN explained that the department wanted some flexibility because flexibility will help the department address a backload of upper-level courses the department has experienced recently; it is an elective in one of the tracks for the major so students will have other options; as a slot course, the topics will change periodically depending on student interest and enrollment trends; and the department wants to have a course at hand should students applying to graduate school need work in a specific area.


Even though the course passed, the Committee spent some time discussing the general appropriateness of rotation such as “Once yearly,” “once every four semesters,” and (everyone’s favorite) “when demand is sufficient”. Are such designations fair to students? How do they know when to plan on taking such a designated course? How do they demonstrate sufficient demand? Other questions included the issue of staffing – if a faculty member has left but has not yet been replaced, how can a department plan to offer the course?


B. Harrison pointed out that currently the Undergraduate Bulletin lists 139 courses to be offered “when demands is sufficient.”


The Committee decided to consult with the Dean’s Office to see if there is perhaps another wording for this issue.


-CSCI 390, Topics in Computer Science: Baldwin from CSI accepted a friendly amendment to change wording under prerequisites to “specific prerequisites will be announced when needed.” Passed.


The Committee wondered how the changing prerequisites would work. Baldwin explained that the topic of the course will be announced in advance so that students will know what the prerequisites will be. Since this is an upper level course, most students will already have the prerequisites easily.


Baldwin says he expects the course will be offered every 3-4 semesters, depending on student demand, faculty interests, staffing needs, etc. The course is also designed to respond quickly to new developments in the field and to give potential new hires ready access to a course in their area of specialization.


Anticipated enrollment is 10-15 students.


Course Revisions/Deletions

-Revision of Hist 229/PLSC229 to become Hist 322/PLSC322

-Deletion of Hist 229/PLSC229 Goeckel accepted the friendly amendment to merge the prerequisites to read “PLSC 120 OR Hist 220 and Hist 221 OR permission of instructor. Passed.


Discussion centered on why the two courses descriptions, one from HIST and one from PLSC had two different prerequisites. Gohlman from HIST and Goeckel from PLSC explained that this jointly-listed course reflected the expectations from each department for entrance into a 300-level course. The proposed merger of the prereqs ended those concerns.


This course will serve majors in History, Political Science, and International Relations (which is in need of more 300-level options in the European track.

II. There was no new business.

III. There was no old business.


Next UCC meeting TBA


Motion to Adjourn at 4:31


Respectfully submitted, Meg Stolee


Undergraduate Curriculum Committee Proposals for Senate First Reading

November 17, 2009


Undergraduate Curriculum Committee Proposals (Go to the “Senate 2009-2010/First Reading 2009 11 17” folder at http://boxes.geneseo.edu/outboxes/DeanOfCollege/doc/ucc/ to view the department proposals)


New Course


ANTH 237 Art and Material Culture


The things that people make and use, from fine art to consumer goods, provide valuable information on cultural ideas and practices. This course approaches art and material culture from an interdisciplinary perspective, across cultures and through time. Current theoretical approaches to art and material culture will be examined and applied to specific objects. Fall even. 3(3-0)


COMN 349: Advanced Issues in Personal and Professional Communication


This course focuses on a topic or related group of topics relevant to personal and professional communication. Personal and professional communication research will be applied and discussed. The course integrates both theories and practical applications. Prerequisites: Completion of all Required Courses in the Personal and Professional Communication track (i.e., COMN 102, 103, 160, 248) or permission of the instructor. Credits: 3(3-0) Offered once yearly.


CSCI 390, Topics in Computer Science


In-depth study of a selected topic in computer science, conducted so as to develop students’ research skills and project design and implementation abilities. Topics will be chosen to reflect new developments in computer science, instructor interest, and/or student demand. Prerequisites: CSci 241, CSci 242, and at least one 300-level CSci course; specific topics may require additional or more specific prerequisites, which will be announced when needed. Credits: 3(3-0). Offered when demand is sufficient.




Course Revision


HIST 322 & PLSC 322


These courses replace the cross listed courses HIST 229 and PLSC 229 and consist of a change in syllabus/requirements to reflect the higher number, change in description, prerequisite change, and course number change. The descriptions are identical except for the cross listed course. Course revisions will increase needed 300-level course offerings in both departments.


PLSC 322

This course will describe and evaluate the historical legacy of Weimar and Nazi Germany, the development of domestic and foreign policies of the two Germanies during the Cold War, and the causes and process of the East German revolution in 1989. Based on this background, the course will address and analyze various policy problems--political, social economic, and foreign--facing contemporary Germany. Themes of continuity and change, coming to terms with the past, and comparisons and relations with the U.S. will highlight the course. (Cross listed with HIST 330) Prerequisites: PLSC 120, HIST 220 and HIST 221, or permission of the instructor. Credits: 3(3-0) Offered when demand is sufficient.


HIST 322

This course will describe and evaluate the historical legacy of Weimar and Nazi Germany, the development of domestic and foreign policies of the two Germanies during the Cold War, and the causes and process of the East German revolution in 1989. Based on this background, the course will address and analyze various policy problems--political, social economic, and foreign--facing contemporary Germany. Themes of continuity and change, coming to terms with the past, and comparisons and relations with the U.S. will highlight the course. (Cross listed with PLSC 330) Prerequisites: PLSC 120, HIST 220 and HIST 221, or permission of the instructor. Credits: 3(3-0) Offered when demand is sufficient.