College Senate Bulletin

Bulletin No. 8
November 25, 2002

Contents
       

Agenda: 2002-2003 All College Meeting, 3 December 2002
Agenda: 2002-2003 College Senate Meeting, 3 December 2002
Announcements:                      
Fall Senate Meeting Listing
Call for Nominations: Campus Awards
Fall Election
Minutes of the Student Affairs Committee 19 November, 2002
Minutes of the Undergraduate Curricula Committee 19 November, 2002
UCC Proposal Summaries (meeting - Nov. 19, 2002):
Addition to GAAC Proposal Summaries (meeting  - Nov. 12, 2002)

 

 

                          

Correspondence:  Terence Bazzett, Department of Psychology,

Sturges 34; e-mail: bazzett@geneseo.edu; phone: (245)-5248

Agenda:

All College Meeting

December 3rd, 2002

Call to Order


Budget Report

 

Adjournment

 

Agenda:

College Senate Meeting Agenda

December 3rd, 2002

Call to Order

Adoption of the Agenda

Approval of the Minutes of the Previous Meetings

pp. 66-69, Senate Bulletin #7

Senate Reports

President                    Christopher Dahl

Provost                       Barbara Dixon

Chair                           Terence Bazzett           

Vice Chair                  Charles Freeman

Treasurer                   Maryellen Schmidt

University Senator     William Gohlman

Central Council          Joshua Lieberman

 

Reports of the Standing Committees of the Senate

Undergraduate Curricula                   Judith Bushnell

Second Reading: (summaries in bulletin 6)

    Revision of a Major Program

Program revision - B.A. in Computer Science (p.56)

Program revision - B.A. in Biology and B.S. in Biology (p.56)

Program Revision: B.A. in Chemistry (p. 58)

Program Revision: B.S. in Chemistry: American Chemical Society Certified (p. 58)

Program Revision: B.S. in Chemistry: American Chem. Soc. Certified; Biochem Option (p. 59)

Program Revision: B.S. Adolescence Certification (7-12) in Chemistry & General Science (p. 59)

    New Course

New course: BCHM 393 (p.56)

New course: BIOL 128 (p.57)

New course: BIOL 302 (p. 57)

New course: ENGL 406/306 (p. 57)

New Course: ENGL 318 (p. 57)

New Course: CHEM 100 (p. 57)

New Course: CHEM 352 (p. 57)

     Course Revision

Course Revision: CHEM340 (p. 58)

Course Revision: CHEM 351 (p. 58)

 

 

 

First Reading: (summaries in this bulletin)

   Course Revision

                Course Revision: PSYC 380 (p.

                Course Revision: ANTH 323 (p.

   New Program

                New Program: Honors Program in Studio Art (p.

 

Undergraduate Policies                     Edward Gillin

Graduate Academic Affairs   Dale Metz

First Reading: (summaries in bulletin 7)

   New Course

New Course ACCT 502: Advanced Financial Accounting (p. 70)

New Course ACCT 503: Strategic Management Accounting (p. 70)

New Course ACCT 520: Advanced Auditing Theory (p. 71)

New Course ACCT 530: Accounting Theory and Research (p. 71)

New Course ECON 525: Managerial Economic Analysis (p. 71)

New Course MGMT 500: Leadership in Organizations (p. 71)

New Course MGMT 511: Financial Management (p. 71)

New Course MGMT 522: Quantitative Analysis (p. 71)

New Course MGMT 550: Information Systems Theory and Practice  (p. 71)

New Course ENGL 406/306 Writing for Teachers (p. 72)

   Course Revisions

Course Revision: CDSc 541  Adult Language Disorders (p. 72)

Course Revision: CDSc 522  Neurogenic Speech Disorders (p. 72)

Course Revision: CDSc 445 Language Intervention w/ Persons w/ Severe Impairment (p. 72)

   Program Revision

Program Revision: Communicative Disorders and Sciences Program (p. 72)

   New Program

MS in Accounting (p. 70)

 

Student Affairs                                   Michael Lynch

Faculty Affairs                                   Rosanne Hartman

 

Old Business

New Business

Adjournment

 

Announcements:

Fall 2002 College Senate Meeting Schedule:
December 3 - ALL COLLEGE MEETING

Call for Nominations:

Campus Awards
 Two Foundation Supported Professorships
Presidents Award for Excellence in Academic Advising
President's Award for Excellence in Part-Time Teaching
President's Award for Excellence in Research and Creative Endeavors
Carol Harter Mentoring Award

 


Nominations for all of the above listed awards will be accepted from faculty, staff and students, and should consist of a narrative of no more than two pages describing the nominee’s fulfillment of the criteria specific to each award.. 

Nominations should be submitted to the Campus Awards Selection Committee, c/o Provost’s Office, Erwin 205, by 4:15 p.m. on Monday, December  16, 2002.

 

Eligibility and criteria requirements as well as past recipients are listed in Bulletin 7.

 

Fall Election:

Voting for fall elections closed at 4:00 P.M. Friday, November 22nd.  Results for those elections will be printed in the final bulletin of this semester.  Thanks again to Maryann Stopha for all of her help.

 

Minutes:

Minutes of Student Affairs Committee

November 19, 2002

 

Committee Members Present:  M.Lynch, M.Fratto, L.Zoller, J.Sergio, K.Davies, J.Tang, G.Gouvernet, C.Geiger, J.Principe, J.Garvey, T.Conklin, C.Tang.   Guest: S.Burwood

Committee Members Absent:  C.Annala, W.Freed, R.Holthaus, D.McPherson, P.Simmons, T.Zollo

 

The meeting was called to order at 4:04 pm.

 

Chair’s Report

M. Lynch

CAS Update – Progress made

·         Director of CAS, Ed Abbott, has been very responsive to SAC requests and concerns.  Dining halls are now open on Friday and Saturday nights. 

·         Additionally, CAS has agreed to take on the additional cost incurred ($1.50 per student) to extend hours.  At least for now, none of this cost is being passed on to students.

·         CAS currently is collecting information about student and faculty satisfaction with campus dining services based on web-accessible survey created by a hired consultant.  Prizes are being offered as incentive for completing survey.

·         CAS is still interested in accepting SAC concerns after survey results.

·         Issue of Lamron representation of CAS was discussed (based on article appearing 11-14-02).  Progress with CAS had been made before article was published; representation of CAS in article seemed unfair since it did not include all the available facts.  SAC chair sent e-mail to Lamron author and CAS director to clarify situation.  Future articles may follow.

o        Discussion:  There still is student concern about cost of food items.  It was noted that prices are comparable to other colleges, and we pay extra for brand names and convenience, but mark-up still very high.

o        K. Davies reported that students consistently request that Books and Bytes Café have extended hours (to match library hours).

o        Discussion about student use of Big Tree Inn.  Students concerned about denial of entrance to Tavern and less expensive fare if under 21.  Faculty (and village members) expressed concern about the boisterous behavior of some students.

Jeremy Byrnes Case:

·         Members of SAC met to discuss the kind of information they think would be helpful to receive from the college.  The goal is to re-affirm that the campus is a safe place for students and faculty.  Members of SAC plan to talk with members of the college administration to explore the possibility of issuing a statement to the college community.

UP Website:

·         Joe VanRemmen was responsive to receiving ideas from SAC to update the UP web-page to suit student needs and provide more links.

Sexual Assault and Alcohol Abuse:

·         Heidi Levine, Director of the Lauderdale Center for Student Health and Counseling, recently expressed interest in working with SAC on opportunities for additional education in this area.  M. Lynch mentioned to Dr. Levine an interest in developing a freshman seminar. The goal of such seminars would be to allow for a prolonged discussion of issues, in contrast to a one-time orientation session.

·         Dr. Levine also encouraged SAC to continue to pay attention to the issue of alcohol use on campus.

o        Discussion:  C. Geiger mentioned that the Chemistry and Physics Departments have seminars dedicated to the “freshman experience”.  Suggested that lectures on these topics could be introduced, but is this feasible in other departments?

New Business:

  • S. Burwood reported that Dean’s office is willing to meet with SAC about pre-registration issues.  SAC will assume responsibility to contact office when ready to discuss. 

Tasks in Progress:

  • Students will formulate list of priorities to submit to CAS board and examine survey to make sure it is hitting most crucial issues.

 

The meeting was adjourned at 5:08 pm. 

The next meeting will take place in the Spring (schedule to be determined).

 

Respectfully submitted,

Michael Lynch, Ph.D.

Chair, SAC

 

Minutes of the Undergraduate Curricula Committee

Meeting #4

November 19, 2002

Members present: S. Brainard, J. Bushnell, J. Cope, A. Kline, D. Norris, K. O'Neill, D. Sullivan, G. Towsley, B. Welker, P. Wong, J. Zook. Visitors: R. MacPherson, E. Spicka, M. Teres.

 

Chair J. Bushnell called the meeting to order at 4:01 p.m.

 

The first item of business was the proposed revision of Psyc 380. The proposal passed unanimously without discussion.

The second item of business was the proposed revision of Anth 323. J. Zook asked whether the course would involve the same amount of work. B. Welker replied that the only changes were the reduced number of weeks allotted to the course and the reduced number of credits. Students will continue to observe monkeys for the same number of hours each day and will gain the same skills as in the past. After an interesting discussion of how one observes howler monkeys (which are more easily observed than other wild primates that require a longer habituation process), the proposal passed unanimously.

The third item of business was the new Honors Program in Studio Art. D. Sullivan asked whether there would be any need for additional faculty and whether the program would have any impact on class size and enrollment. T. MacPherson replied that program enrollment would be limited to a small group of students who are exceptionally talented and would benefit from the program. Since these students would already be art majors, the program would have no impact on class size, enrollment, or staffing. He noted that the program would include some directed studies, and M. Teres added that the directed studies sometimes are internships. D. Sullivan asked whether the new program would adequately accomplish the goal of improving students' preparation for graduate programs. T. MacPherson replied that he had contacted four graduate art schools and all agreed that the new program would better prepare students for graduate school than the current Art Studio major does. J. Zook asked if the new program formalized what the department has been doing all along with its most talented majors. T. MacPherson replied that the Honors Program would guarantee more rigor than the current program. M. Teres added that the Honors designation should distinguish the program from the B.A. in Art Studio and encourage graduate schools to take a closer look at students' transcripts. He added that one SUNY unit recently had its proposal for a new B.F.A. rejected by System Administration and that the institution found Geneseo's proposed honors program a good alternative. M. Teres said that the proposed program maintains the strength of Geneseo's liberal arts degree rather than concentrating too heavily on art courses. T. MacPherson noted that the required courses outside art build critical thinking and writing skills that many graduate art programs look for. B. Welker asked about the required G.P.A., and T. MacPherson replied that students must have a 3.6 in the major to be admitted to the program. B. Welker asked how student portfolios are reviewed, and T. MacPherson replied that they are evaluated by faculty with the expertise and ability to judge artistic talent. M. Teres noted that students would enter the program by departmental invitation or by applying and being reviewed by the faculty. A. Kline asked if transfer students could enter the program as sophomores or juniors. M. Teres replied that it might be difficult for students to enter the program as juniors, and that they probably would not be able to complete the degree in a traditional four-year timeframe, but the same thing can happen with transfer students enrolled in the B.A. in Art Studio program. J. Bushnell observed that the list of courses eligible for the 12 credits of related requirements included many courses that satisfy general education requirements, and asked whether courses from this list could also be counted toward general education requirements. T. MacPherson replied that they could. J. Zook asked if there were any restrictions about the 12 credits of related requirements; for example, would students be able to take all courses from one department, or would they be more restricted. T. MacPherson said the department did not intend to restrict students in their choice of related requirements. D. Norris noted that the list of courses eligible for fulfilling the 12 credits of related requirements included Geography courses, and suggested that Geog 123 (The Developing World) might be an appropriate addition to the list and is also eligible for Social Sciences and Multicultural credit. The committee and Art department representatives agreed to add Geog 123 to the list. T. MacPherson noted that the Honors Program would also help our students gain admission to graduate certification programs for art teachers; graduate education programs as well as M.F.A. programs have considered our art graduates deficient in some curricular areas. A. Kline added that increasing numbers of students are inquiring about getting an art degree and teaching. Without further discussion or change, the proposal passed unanimously.

 

J. Bushnell announced that this would be the last U.C.C. meeting for the semester, thanked the committee members for their work, and wished them happy holidays and good luck with finals. The meeting adjourned at 4:24 p.m.

 

Respectfully submitted,

Judith Bushnell

 

UCC Proposal Summaries (meeting - Nov. 19, 2002):

(Full text proposals are available for review by contacting the Office of the Dean of the College)

 

Course revision: Psyc 380: Change course title from Systems of Psychology to History and Systems of Psychology. Basic course description remains the same, except for prerequisites. Current prerequisites are

Psyc 250, Psyc 251, and one 300-level Psychology course. Proposed prerequisites: Three courses in Psychology or permission of the instructor. Rationale: the department believes the course would be of interest to a more varied group of students if the title were more descriptive of course content and if the current prerequisites (which are not necessary for students to understand or profit from the material included in this course) were replaced with less restrictive prerequisites that will provide students with adequate preparation for the course. Interdepartmental impact: the prerequisite change will make the course available to students other than Psychology majors. Students most likely to benefit are majors from History, Philosophy, Political Science, Anthropology, Biology, and Education.

 

Course revision: Anth 323, Primate Behavior Field Methods. Change from 6 credit hours to 3 credit hours. Rationale: The instructor feels that 7 weeks is too long for students to be away during the summer, especially considering that they will be following monkeys for up to 8 hours a day early in the rainy season. Students will gain the same basic benefits from a shorter field experience without the drudgery and isolation

inherent in this type of work. Interdepartmental impact: none.

 

New program: Honors Program in Studio Art. Bulletin description: The Honors Program in Studio Art is designed to lead the very talented students to find their way as artists, while providing them with the structure that will assist in their acceptance into graduate programs in studio art or art education. This program is designed to encompass a more rigorous course of study while allowing for the outreach to other humanities and science disciplines on the part of the participating students. Grounds for admission into the program: 1) Portfolio review, 2) Completion of Foundations Courses by the end of sophomore year, 3) GPA of 3.6 or special consideration in major courses. B.A. Requirement: 120 credits. General Education requirements: 31 to 47 credits. Arts Honors requirements: 72 credits. Electives: 1 to 17 credits. Details of Arts Honors requirements (72 credits): 1) Foundation courses (27 credits): Two-dimensional Design; Three-Dimensional Design or Sculpture I or Ceramics I or Jewelry and Metals I; Drawing I; Drawing II; Photography I; Figure Drawing I; ArtH 285 Contemporary Art; ArtH 171 Survey of Western Art: Prehistoric to Gothic; ArtH 172 Survey of Western Art: Renaissance to Modern; 2) four electives (12 credits) from: Figure Drawing II, Oil Painting I, Watercolor I, Mixed Media I, Printmaking I, Sculpture I,

Ceramics I, Jewelry and Metals I, Design in Wood I, Computer Art, or Graphic Design; 3) Other Art requirements (3 credits): portfolio review, senior exhibition, senior studio seminar; 4) related requirements: 12 credits from the following: Phil 225, Phil 118, Phil 108, Thea 235, Thea 236, Thea 129, Thea 130, Danc 100, Danc 240, Danc 221, Danc 222, Musc 100, Musc 123, Musc 120, Anth 120, Anth 100, Anth 110, Anth 203, Anth 229, Biol 103, Engl 170, Engl 201, Engl 285, Geog 102, Geog 123, Geog 291, Geog 250,

Hist 213; 5) Specialty Courses: 18 credits concentrating in one of the following media: ceramics, computer art, textiles, jewelry and metal, painting (any combination of courses: oil, watercolor, mixed media), printing, photography, drawing, sculpture (wood, ceramics), wood design, graphic design. Rationale: The Department sees a need to provide a more rigorous program for those very special students who exhibit promise of becoming practicing artists. During the last ten years, approximately a dozen Studio Art majors have fit this category. While the current Studio Art major functions well for the majority of students, exceptional students have encountered some problems being accepted into graduate studio art programs and graduate art education programs because they were judged to be underprepared. The Studio Arts Honors Program is designed to lead students to find their way as artists, while providing them with a structure that will assist them into graduate programs. Interdepartmental impact: none.

 

 

Addition to GAAC Proposal Summaries (meeting  - Nov. 12, 2002)

Bulletin #7 (pp. 72-73) listed current descriptions of three courses for which description changes are being proposed.  The proposed description was not included in that bulletin.  Below are both the proposed and the current descriptions for these three courses.

 

Proposed -CDSC 445 Severe Language Impairment and ACC

An in-depth study is made of formal and informal language assessment and intervention procedures (including augmentative/alternative communication) for preverbal and early verbal individuals, with emphasis on infants.  Severe language delays and disorders area also discussed. Intervention techniques include essential presymbolic, social/communication and language skills, and augmentative/alternative modes of communication.  This course addresses issues pertaining to normal and abnormal human development and behavior across the life span.  3(3-0).  Offered every fall.

Current - CDSc 445  Language Intervention with Persons with Severe Impairment

An in-depth study is made of formal and informal language assessment and intervention procedures for preverbal and early verbal individuals.  Severe language delays and disorders are discussed as related to various disabilities, such as autism, mental retardation, and hearing impairment.  Intervention techniques include essential presymbolic, social/communication and language skills, and augmentative modes of communication.  This course addresses issues pertaining to normal and abnormal human development and behavior across the life span.  3(3-0).  Offered every fall.

 

Proposed - CDSC 522 Neurogenic Speech Disorders

Etiology, types, symptoms, and treatments of speech disorders caused by central nervous system diseases are considered in detail.  Special consideration is given to the inter-disciplinary approach to treatment of communication problems of these individuals and to the use of augmentative communication systems.  This course addresses issues pertaining to normal and abnormal human development and behavior across the life span.  Prerequisite:  CDSC 434. 3(3-0).  Offered every fall.

 

Current - CDSc 522  Neurogenic Speech Disorders

Etiology, types, symptoms, and treatment of speech disorders caused by central nervous system diseases are considered in detail.  Special consideration is given to the inter-disciplinary approach to treatment of communication problems of these individuals and to the use of augmentative communication systems.  This course addresses issues pertaining to normal and abnormal human development and behavior across the life span.  3(3-0).  Offered every fall.

 

Proposed - CDSC 541 Adult Language Disorders

Designed to increase understanding of communication characteristics of adults with the primary focus on evaluation and treatment of adults with aphasia.  Course content also includes other selected geriatric communication problems with neurological bases, historical background, current issues, family  and patient conferencing, and team approach to staffing adults with communication problems.  This course addresses issues pertaining to normal and abnormal human development and behavior across the life span.  Prerequisite:  CDSC 434.  (3(3-0).  Offered every fall.

 

Current - CDSc 541  Adult Language Disorders

Designed to increase understanding of communication characteristics of adults with the primary focus on evaluation and treatment of adults with aphasia.  Course content also includes other selected geriatric communication problems with neurological bases, historical background, current issues, family and patient conferencing, and team approach to staffing adults with communication problems.  This course addresses issues pertaining to normal and abnormal human development and behavior across the life span.  3(3-0).  Offered every fall.