College Senate Bulletin

Bulletin No. 7

October 30, 2003


Agenda for Senate Meeting on November 4, 2003
Announcements
Fall 2003 College Senate Meeting Schedule
Fall Elections
Minutes: Faculty Affairs Committee, October 21, 2003
Minutes: Policy Committee, October 21, 2003
Minutes: Undergraduate Curriculum Committee, October 21, 2003
UCC Proposal Summaries Considered at October 21, 2003 Meeting
Minutes: Graduate Academic Affairs Committee, October 23, 2003
GAAC Proposal Summaries
Policy Statement Regarding Mid-term Grade Reports for First Semester Transfer Students
Memo regarding change in Charge and Membership of General Education Committee
University Faculty Senate Resolution Regarding System-wide Assessment
Sense of Senate Regarding System-wide Assessment
Minutes: UCC Meeting, October 28, 2003
UCC Proposal Summaries

Correspondence: Charlie Freeman, Department of Physics,

Greene 202; e-mail: freeman@geneseo.edu; phone: 245-5286


Agenda for Senate Meeting on November 4, 2003

Call to Order

Adoption of the Agenda

Approval of the Minutes of the Previous Meeting

p. 46-49, Senate Bulletin 6

Senate Reports

President Christopher Dahl

Provost David Gordon

Chair Charles Freeman

Vice Chair Gregg Hartvigsen

Treasurer Errol Putman

University Senator William Gohlman

Central Council Liz Dance

Reports of the Standing Committees of the Senate

Undergraduate Curricula Cynthia Klima

Second Reading:

Course Revision -- Dance Minor (p. 41)

Course Deletion -- S/ Anth 110 (p. 41)

Course Revision -- Biol 381, 382, 395, 399 (p. 41)

First Reading:

New Courses

ANTH 313 (p. 74)

ARTH 173 (F/ Core) (p. 74)

ARTH 378 (p. 75)
ARTH 379 (p. 75)

BIOL 307 (p. 60)

CHEM 315 (p. 60)

ECON 345 (p. 61)

ENGL 239 (p. 77)
ENGL 336 (p. 77)
GEOG 382 (p. 78)
GEOG 386 (p. 78)
HIST 214 (p. 78)
HIST 232 (p. 78)
HIST 362 (M/ Core) (p. 78)

HIST 369 (p. 59)

SPAN 314 (M/ Core) (p. 80)

SOCL 376 (p. 79)
SOCL 377 (p. 79)
SOCL 378 (p. 80)
SOCL 379 (p. 80)
THEA 347 (p. 61)

Course Revisions

ANTH 201 (p. 63)

ANTH 204 (p. 63)

ANTH 232 (p. 63)

ANTH 301 (p. 63)

ANTH 304 (p. 63)

ANTH 309 (p. 63)

ANTH 208 (p. 74)
ANTH 393 (p. 74)
ARTH 172 (p. 74)

ARTH 201 (p. 74)
ARTH 202 (p. 74)
ARTS 235 (p. 75)
ARTS 335 (p. 75)
ARTS 365 (p. 75)

DANC 211 (F/ Core) (p. 76)

ENVR 124 (p. 64)

ENVR 395 (p. 64)

GEOG 375 (p. 78)
GSCI 333 (p. 62)

HIST 352 (p. 78)

PHYS 362 (p. 59)

PHYS 363 (p. 59)

PHYS 372 (p. 59)

PSYC 340 (p. 79)
PSYC 360 (p. 79)
SPAN 313 (p. 80)

SPAN 325 (p. 80)

SPAN 326 (p. 80)

THEA 290 (F/ Core) (p. 81)

THEA 100 (p. 82)

THEA 140 (p. 82)

THEA 200 (p. 82)

THEA 203 (p. 82)

THEA 221 (p. 82)

THEA 305 (p. 82)

THEA 311 (p. 82)

THEA 320 (p. 82)

THEA 330 (p. 82)

THEA 340 (p. 82)

THEA 204 (p. 82)

DANC 211 (p. 82)

Course Deletion

BIOL 370 (p. 76)

BIOL 373 (p. 76)

CHEM 210 (p. 76)

EDUC 338 (p. 76)

EDUC 381 (p. 76)

GEOG 260 (p. 77)

H&PE 103 (p. 76)

H&PE 109 (p. 76)

H&PE 115 (p. 76)

H&PE 121 (p. 76)

H&PE 122 (p. 76)

H&PE 136 (p. 76)

H&PE 138 (p. 76)

H&PE 206 (p. 76)

H&PE 215 (p. 76)

H&PE 218 (p. 76)

H&PE 221 (p. 76)

H&PE 222 (p. 76)

H&PE 223 (p. 76)

H&PE 224 (p. 76)

H&PE 242 (p. 76)

HIST 201 (p. 76)

HIST 317 (p. 76)

MUSC 230 (p. 76)

PHIL 102 (p. 76)

PHIL 103 (p. 78)

PHIL 105 (p. 78)
PHIL 206 (p. 76)

SOCL 375 (p. 79)
THEA 244 (p. 61)

Revisions of Major

BA in Art History (p. 75)
BA in Biology (p. 60)

BS in Biology (p. 61)

Early Childhood, Childhood, Childhood w/ Special Ed (add minimum competency in MATH 140, 141) (p. 77)
Education BS, Spanish concentration (revision to include SPAN 314) (p. 81)

BA in Geography (p. 62)

International Relations Major (revision to include SPAN 314) (p. 81)

BA in Spanish, (revision to include SPAN 314) (p. 81)

BA in Theatre (revision to include THEA 347) (p. 81)
Revisions of Minor

Asian Studies Minor (p. 63)

Conflict Studies Minor (p. 75)
Environmental Studies Minor (p. 77)

Minor in Geography (p. 62)

Latin American Studies Minor (revision to include SPAN 314) (p. 81)

Urban Studies minor (p. 82)
Revised Major - Deleting Option

Pre-Professional Option in the Geography Major (deletion) (p. 62)

Concentration Revision

Concentration in Theatre (p. 61)

Concentration in Dance (p. 62)

Undergraduate Policies Harold Hoops

First Reading: Proposal for Midterm Grade Reports for First Semester Transfer Students (see this bulletin, p. 67 and also Policy Committee Minutes, p. 56)

Graduate Academic Affairs Dale Metz

First Reading:

Revision of a Major Program

Master of Science in Education - Adolescence Education (French) (p. 64)

Master of Science in Education - Adolescence Education (Spanish) (p. 65)

Master of Science in Education - Adolescence Education (Mathematics) (p. 66)

New Course

Intd 510, Seminar on Secondary School Mathematics and Pedagogy (p. 66)

Student Affairs Michael Lynch

Faculty Affairs Rosanne Hartman

Old Business

New Business

Adjournment


Fall 2003 College Senate Meeting Schedule

November 4

December 2

Fall Elections

Ballots for the Fall 2003 elections will be distributed during the week of October 27, 2003. Voting will be performed electronically via the web. Detailed instructions for casting votes electronically will be sent out to each member of the teaching faculty. The deadline for submitting ballots will be November 21, 2003. Thanks to Maryann Stopha for setting up the electronic voting this year.

Minutes: Faculty Affairs Committee, October 21, 2003

Present: Bearden, J., Bicket, D., Everett, T., Hannam, K., Hartman, R., Pretzer, R., Savellos, E., Tartick, B., Tze-Ki, H., Young, R.

1. Old Business:

A. Fire drills and exam interruption

Guests:

Sue Chichester, Director Computing & Information Technology

Joseph Vanremmen, Police Manager

Previously, members of FAC had discussed the possibility of using a spreadsheet to input information concerning class exam schedules and coordinating fire drills. Sue Chichester addressed the committee about the possibility of coordinating an authenticated computerized system. Some concerns were discussed about setting up this type of system. For example, who would maintain and update the system? Would faculty use the system once it is in place? Does the need justify the use of resources?

Officer Joe Vanremmen discussed the process of scheduling the fire drills and NYS mandates for carrying out fire drills. He also discussed the manpower needed in the department of University Police to carry out a fire drill: 3-4 people a shift, 1 officer to answer calls and 2 officers to deal with the drill. Officer Vanremmen stated that attempts are made to schedule the drills within the first three to four weeks of a semester.

After some discussion, it was decided that interested faculty would submit information about scheduled exam dates by the end of the first week of classes, spring semester 2004 to the University Police. When possible, University Police would then try to coordinate fire drills around scheduled exams (If there was more demand for this consideration than UP could comfortably handle, FAC would revisit the issue and look for other alternatives). Officer Vanremmen stated he would need to get approval for this process from Captain Bob Ossant. Officer Vanremmen will let R. Hartman know the outcome of the discussion with Captain Ossant within a week.

2. No new business.

Respectfully submitted,

Rosanne Hartman,

Chairperson, Faculty Affairs

Minutes: Committee on Undergraduate Policy, Core, and Review, October 21, 2003

Policy Members Present: H. Hoops (Chair), D. Andreson, E. Coloccia, K. Cunningham, A. Eisenberg, E. Gillin, D. Granger, S. Iyer, C. Jadlos, J. Over, S. Schwartz, Y. Tamura, C. Truglia and A. Shenoy.

Guests: Dean S. Bailey and Associate Dean M. Stolee

Excused: M. Lima

The meeting was called to order at 4:00pm.

The chair opened by saying that the meeting was called at the request of Dean Bailey with regards to a change in Geneseo’s policy on midterm grades. Below is the memo from the Dean’s office:

To: Members of the Policy Committee, College Senate

FROM: Office of the Dean

We are proposing a change in Geneseo’s policy on midterm grades. Here is the current policy from the Undergraduate Bulletin:

At the midpoint of the fall and spring semesters, instructors report the academic achievement of freshmen to the Director of Records. Freshmen receive a “Mid-Semester Grade Report” (on the web) and are advised to review their status with their academic advisors. This grade information is distributed to advisors. The Dean sends a warning letter, expressing concern and offering suggestions, to any freshman earning a grade of less than “C” in any course.

The proposal is to add “and all first semester transfer students.” This means that faculty would report midterm grades for all first year students for both semesters of the freshman year as well as for all transfer students in their first semester.

Justification:

1. Entering a new institution is difficult. We recognize this when we monitor and advise first year students through the mid term grades process. Transfer students are also experiencing the transition to a new institution and would benefit from the extra monitoring that this process allows.

2. Transfer students typically experience a significant drop in their grade point averages during their first semester at Geneseo. It is possible that some of this drop could be lessened if potential areas of academic difficulty were discerned at mid semester.

3. In recent years, the distinction between first year students and transfer students has blurred. For example, Admissions classifies a student with 24 hours of academic credit from another college as a transfer, yet we are seeing first year students with as many as 40 hours of credit at entry. Both sets of these students are confident that their backgrounds prepare them for the rigor of Geneseo courses, yet sometimes this confidence is mistaken. Including both groups in the mid term grades process is therefore a good idea.

4. All three of Geneseo’s pre-professional programs have entrance and continuation standards based partially on GPA. Advisors in those programs will be better equipped to advise new transfers about the next semester if they have a more accurate sense of the student’s progress at midterm.

Dean Bailey and M. Stolee opened the discussion by going over their proposal to have transfer students receive midterm grades during their first semester. The rationale is similar to the one behind offering this service to freshman during their first two semesters. As with freshmen, the dean’s office will issue letters to transfer students who receive C- or lower for mid-term grades. This letter is intended to help students change their study habits for the second half of the semester to prevent a drop in their GPA. Anecdotal evidence indicates that midterm grades are beneficial to both students and faculty.

Members had many questions about midterm grades and transfer program in general that were answered/clarified by Dean Bailey and M. Stolee.

Q: Is there a difference between transfer students from 2-yr schools and 4-yr schools? Is the transition more drastic for students coming from 2-yr schools?

A: About 65-70% of transfer students are from 2-yr colleges. However, the number of students transferring from another 4-yr institution is growing. A drop in their GPA during the first semester seems universal. Midterm grades will benefit both groups. The dean’s office is unable to distinguish between the needs of these two groups with regards to midterm grades.

Q: Do all faculty members report midterm grades?

A: About 15% do not return grades.

Q: If this proposal is approved, approximately how many more students will be receiving midterm grades?

A: The increase will amount to about 10 more students per faculty. Some departments will have to report more midterm grades than others, e.g., Business, Education. Also, faculty might have to report midterm grades for non-freshman courses.

A discussion about the benefits of midterm grades ensued. Midterm grades will be a reminder for students who are having trouble to get help and make appropriate changes. Transfer students are not as “plugged in” as juniors and senior. They also tend to take more credits (19 or more!) per semester to make up for lost time. Overloading during the first semester while they are still adjusting to the new environment commonly creates a drop in GPA. This notification will serve as a mid-semester checkup.

Noting that there were no points raised in opposition to the proposal the chair called for a vote. The proposal was approved unanimously.

The meeting was adjourned at 4:36pm.

Respectfully submitted,

Savi Iyer

Department of Physics and Astronomy

Proposal for an editorial change approved by email from Oct 23 – 28.

Change the phrase to “and all first semester transfer students” to “and first semester transfer students. This makes the language consistent with the original text that referred to “freshmen students” rather than “all freshman students”.

Approved by email consensus Oct 28.

Minutes: Undergraduate Curriculum Committee, October 21, 2003

Attending:

Members: A. Weibel, K. Hurst, S.A. Brainard, B. Owens, J. Giordano, M. Lewis, A. Kline, J. Cope, D. Norris, C. Klima (Chair), D. Sullivan, I. Bosch, Z. Zhao, G. Towsley

Visitors: J. Boiani, J. Ferrell, J. Johnston, B. Howard, J. Williams, R. Spear, E. Spicka, J. McLean, J. Kleiman

Excused: K. O’Neill

The following new courses, course revisions, and program revisions were moved, seconded, and approved by the committee:

PHYS 362 (course revision)

PHYS 363 (course revision)

PHYS 372 (course revision)

HIST 369 (new course)

CHEM 315 (new course)

BIOL 307 (new course)

BA in Biology

BS in Biology

ECON 345 (new course)

THEA 244 (course deletion)

THEA 347 (new course)

Concentration in Theatre (program revision)

Concentration in Dance (program revision)

GSCI 333 (course revision)

BA in Geography (program revision)

Pre-Professional Option in the Geography Major (deletion)

Minor in Geography (program revision)

ANTH 201 (course revision)

ANTH 204 (course revision)

ANTH 232 (course revision)

ANTH 301 (course revision)

ANTH 304 (course revision)

ANTH 309 (course revision)

Asian Studies Minor (program revision)

ENVR 124 (course revision)

ENVR 395 (course revision)

The meeting adjourned at 5:05

UCC Proposal Summaries Considered at Meeting on October 21, 2003

(Full text proposals are available for review at http://www.geneseo.edu/~doc/ucc/forms.shtml.)

1. Physics 362: Title Change from Intermediate Laboratory I to Intermediate Laboratory and prereq. Change to Phys. 226 (revised course – title/prerequisite)

Rationale: The change in title (remove the roman numeral) would better reflect the one semester nature of the course. An additional proposal will be submitted from our department to have the description and title of Phys 363 changed from Intermediate Laboratory II. The change in prereq. assures that students registered for Phys 362 will have at least three semesters of physics lab experience prior to taking this course. This better reflects current practices.

2. Physics 363: Title change to: Instrumentation and Interfacing: Shifting focus on experiments with more sophisticated equipment and adding a Csci credit prereq. (revision course- title/syllabus/description)

Rationale: Although this represents a major change in the description of course content, this course will have the same place as the old course in the sequence of courses required for physics majors. The change reflects the fact that modern experimental physics research laboratory virtually always includes automated equipment. Therefore, we think it wise to shift the focus from experiments with more sophisticated physics to experiments with more sophisticated equipment.

Phys 363 has been offered in this format for several years, with favorable response from students.

The addition of the Csci credit prereq. will have minor impact on students, since a Csci course is already required for the major and is typically satisfied in the sophomore year.

3. Physics 372: Title change to: Undergraduate Research and minor description change. Rotation to every semester (revision course – title/syllabus/description)

Rationale: The current course title is too specific for current practices and the proposed title change would better reflect the nature of the course. The current course description would be augmented to include a broader scope of research options. We anticipate the proposed change from “undertake project” to “complete a significant project” would provide a better sense of the research commitment during the specified semester. The rotation would become every semester. These updates would conform to current practices.

4. History 369: Environmental Though and Politics in Modern America (new course)

Rationale: Environmental issues are of ever-increasing importance in American society. The ways in which we think about and manipulate nature have a profound impact on our economy, social institutions, and cultural and intellectual life. They also have a profound impact on the health of the biosphere, which supports all life on the planet. This course will connect all of these concerns with the broad intellectual and political themes that Geneseo students encounter in HUMN I and II, as well as with many of the more specialized issues they explore in their coursework in the natural and social sciences. As my own research focuses on the intersection of environmental politics and technology in modern America, I am particularly well-suited to offer this important course.

5. Chemistry 315: Bioorganic Chemistry (new course)

Rationale: In response to student feedback requesting a wider selection of advanced electives from which to choose, this course was offered as an experimental course in the Spring semester of 2003. Feedback at the end of the course was overwhelmingly positive in response to the question “Should this course be offered as an advanced elective?” The field of bioorganic chemistry overlaps organic chemistry on one side and biology on the other. By its very nature, the field is interdisciplinary and integrates information from any different courses that chemistry and biochemistry students take as part of their course of study. The explosion of research in structural biology and biochemistry has made it quite clear that biological processes can be traced back to chemical reactions and to the structure and interaction of molecules. This course explores a small corner of this enormous field, namely the area of natural product biosynthesis. Natural product biosynthesis allows one t show how diverse topics such as synthetic organic chemistry, enzyme kinetics, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and molecular genetics can be used to answer questions such as “How does a plant make this unique chemical species?” Other topics covered include more philosophical questions such as “Why does a plant spend so much metabolic energy producing a chemical that often does not appear to play any roles in the plant’s survival?” This course ends with a survey of the uses of natural products through history for purposes that sometimes were not as noble as current healing practices in medicine.

6. Biology 307: Advanced Genetic Analysis (new course)

Rationale: Needed to give coverage to an expanding subject. A one semester course in genetics is no longer adequate for students wanting to attend a graduate school in genetics.

7. B.A. in Biology: Biol hrs. dropped by one, biol electives increased by one, Csci requirement eliminated, add choice of science-related requirements, reduce boil electives from 6 to 4.

Rationale: The B.A. degree is designed for students who do not want to go to graduate school in the biological sciences or who want a double major. Its requirements are more flexible to meet the diverse needs of students who plan to teach in secondary schools, enter professional programs or have careers outside of the biological sciences.

The first change in the B. A. degree is the same as in the B.S. The credit removed from the required Biology credits has been moved to the Biology electives. This is so courses other than the Biology seminar (Biol 380) may be used to fulfill the Department’s writing requirement and the SUNY basic communication and research outcome.

The second change in the B.A. degree is to reduce the number of related requirements and allow students greater freedom to select courses outside of mathematics and the sciences; therefore, the computer science requirement has been eliminated. Our current students are coming in with the minimal levels of computer literacy that this requirement was designed to insure.

The third change in the B.A. degree is to add one more choice in the area of related requirements. In addition to allowing students to take either a year of physics or a year of geological sciences in the related requirements, the faculty decided that some students entering secondary education would benefit from having a semester of both physics and geology. This would insure that the student would have at least one introductory class in all of the sciences. It could also be of benefit to transfer students who often come in with just one semester of a science and are now forced to take a second semester of a course that can be quite different.

The last change is also common to both degrees. It reduces the number of hours students may use for biology electives from six to four from directed studies, internships and research. This insures that students will have at least one specific, content based lecture or lab course. This is especially critical in the B.A. degree which requires only eight elective credits.

8. B.S. in Biology: Biol hours dropped by one, biology electives increased by one, second lab requirement, remove GSCI as an option, directed study or internship credits dropped from 6 to 4.

Rationale: Changes in the College and Department’s requirements over a number of years have blurred the distinction between the B.A. and B.S. degrees in Biology. After a systematic review of both degrees, the members of the Biology Department voted to adopt four changes to each degree plan. These changes should increase the flexibility of the B.A. degree for students, especially those who plan to teach secondary school, enter professional programs or have a career outside of the biological sciences. Changes in the B.S. degree are designed to increase its focus on students who plan to attend graduate school and a career in the biological sciences.

The first change is actually common to both degree plans. While there is no net change in the number of hours required in biology, the number of credit hours of required biology courses has dropped by one and the number of biology electives increased by one. We decided that selective 300 level electives in Biology could perform the functions of the biology seminar (Biol 380) and meet the Department’s writing requirements and the new SUNY basic communication and research outcome. This change should provide students greater choice in courses and more flexibility in meeting these requirements.

The second change in the B.S. degree adds a second lab requirement to the Biology electives. In addition to the labs in the required biology courses, students will be required to take two laboratories, either as separate one or two credit laboratory courses or as part of a four credit course that has both a lecture and laboratory. We have recognized for years that our students take too few upper level laboratories compared with their counter-parts at other colleges and universities. While the reviewers in our recent program review specifically noted a lack of biology labs in the second year, the Department decided to allow students some flexibility about meeting this requirement. Our second year students already have a heavy load of labs with labs in organic chemistry and physics.

The third change in the B.S. degree removes geological sciences as an option to meet a related course requirement. Virtually all graduate programs in biology and related sciences require students to have taken a year of physics. Students should be required to take physics and encouraged to take geology in addition to the related requirements if they are interested in it or if it is appropriate to their biological interests.

Finally, we decided to reduce the number of credits from six to four that students may use from directed studies, internships and research for the biology electives. While we strongly encourage students to participate in these activities, we have to insure they have a breadth of knowledge that comes from having specific, content based lecture or lab courses.

9. Economics 345: Economics of Sports (new course)

Rationale: The addition of this course will broaden the upper-level course offerings for the economics majors, while utilizing the expertise of the faculty.

10. Theatre 347: Sound Design (new course)

Rationale: A significant number of our students have an interest in stage sound mechanics and design. Several have gone on to graduate programs in sound design, most recently at Memphis University, North Carolina School of the Arts, Ohio University, and Yale. While they have had the opportunity to study sound mechanics in Thea. 244, the new course will provide them with opportunities in sound design also.

11. Theater 244: Stage Electrics and Sound (course deletion)

Rationale: Thea. 244 would be replaced by a new course, Thea. 347 Sound Design. A significant number of our students have an interest in stage sound mechanics and design. Several have gone on to graduate programs in sound design, most recently at Memphis University, North Carolina School of the Arts, Ohio University, and Yale. While they have had the opportunity to study sound mechanics in Thea. 244, they have had no such opportunity in sound design. The new course will provide them with opportunities in sound design also.

12. Theatre Concentration: To require 30 hours and replace courses. Offer instead Thea 200 or Thea 204 or Danc 211 (revised concentration – requirements)

Rationale: The 2002-2004 Undergraduate Bulletin listing of the theatre concentration contains an error of unknown origin: requirements number 33 hours instead of 30. And because SOPA is proposing the deletion of Thea 250 Creative Dramatics from its theatre curriculum, it proposes the replacement of that course in the concentration, as well as the seldom-offered course, Danc 260 Creative Dance for Children, with either Thea 200 The American Theatre or Thea 204 Asian Theatre Survey or Danc 211 Cultural Dance of Asian Peoples to increase course opportunities for students. Reducing the number of elective hours from 12 to 9 accounts for the overall reduction of programmatic hours from 33 to 30.

13. Dance Concentration: To require 30 hours and provide more course choices and flexibility (revised concentration – requirements)

Rationale: The 2002-2004 Undergraduate Bulletin listing of the dance concentration contains two errors of unknown origin: requirements number 32 hours instead of 30; ballet, modern dance, jazz dance, cultural dance, and body conditioning bear 2 hours credit, not 1, as stated. Indeed, the listed program is impossible for students to complete. The proposed revision not only is arithmetically correct but also provides students with more course choices and scheduling flexibility.

14. GSCI 333: Geologic Applications of Remote Sensing (revised course – syllabus/description)

Rationale: The existing GSci 333 course needs to be officially updated to integrate digital image analysis techniques with geologic mapping methods by combining traditional field study methods with modern image enhancement and GIS-based software. Some of these advances have been gradually incorporated into the existing GSci 333 course over many years. Although aerial photography is being replaced by satellite imagery for regional projects, both are equally important tools for detailed geologic field studies that use modern data manipulation techniques. Many field studies still rely heavily on the availability of aerial photography, but map production in government agencies, such as the US Geological Survey, now depends entirely on GIS-based software programs, such as ArcView ®. Students should be adequately grounded in the applications and limitations of aerial photography, as well as digital imagery. Specifically, students should be familiar with the field methods and software applications of GIS map products that have become standard in industry and government agencies. This revolution in the mapping sciences permits the rapid and accurate interchange and display of integrated data sets at any scale and on any georegistered or rectified base map.

15. BA in Geography: Revised Requirements – now 41 credit hours (revised major)

Rationale: The changes incorporated in "Item V" are as follows:

* Increase the total required hours for the B.A. Geography degree from 37 to 41 credit hours (with the "Basic Requirements" increasing by 4 credit hours).

* Geog 365, The Geography of Islam, a new course Senate approved 5/6/03, will now fulfill the Advanced Regional requirement of the major (giving 5 course selections in Advanced Regional). Of the four courses currently listed on p. 243 of the Bulletin, only two, Geog 362 and Geog 366, are now taught on a regular basis. The desirability of a course which engages the circumstances of the world's one billion Muslims scarcely needs emphasis.

* Geog 374, Geographic Thought (3 cr. hrs.), previously an elective, moves to a Basic Requirement. This course will now incorporate the Department's Writing Requirement (writing req. has been a component of Geog 261, Geog of N. Amer). Notice of intent to change course holding Dept's Writing Requirement to be sent Dean's Office 9/03.

* Geog 375, Field Experience (1 cr. hr.) is made a Basic Requirement. This course was inadvertently omitted from the 2002-2004 Undergraduate Bulletin but has been an elective in the major.

----------------------

* Geog 368, Alpine & Arctic Environments, moves from an "elective" to the "Advanced Physical Course" options in the major. Gives students more choice in the "Advanced Physical" listings and better categorizes the course.

· Geog 395, Geography/Planning Internship should be listed as an elective. Inadvertently omitted from the 2002-2004 Undergraduate Bulletin, p. 243.

16. BA in Geography: Deleting the Pre-Professional Planning Option (revised major – deleting option)

Rationale: The Pre-Professional Planning Option (or concentration) has not been popular with students in the Geography Department for several years, and there is no good reason at this time to keep the Option in the major.

17. Geography minor: Basic requirements now at 22 credit hours (revised minor)

Rationale: Gives more focus to the Geography Minor and gears students toward learning what is considered, by Geography faculty, to be important for them to know.

18. Anthropology 201: Human Evolution (revised course)

Rationale: While “ANTH 105: Introduction to Physical Anthropology” provides students with a foundation upon which to build in “ANTH 201: Human evolution”, many students have successfully taken the course (prior to the current practice of checkstops preventing them from doing so) without the prerequisite. There are three categories of students that take the class without the prerequisite:

1. anthropology students who are unable to take the two courses in the recommended sequence

2. upper classmen from a variety of curricula, especially biology

non-majors who have an interest in the subject but do not have the time or flexibility to take the prerequisite.

19. Anthropology 204: Human Adaptation and Variation – adding Permission of Instructor as a prereq. and rotation change to every fall. (revised course – prereq. and rotation)

Rationale: Only a small portion of “ANTH 105: Introduction to physical anthropology” pertains to “ANTH 204: Human adaptation and variation”. In addition, while it is an elective for Environmental Studies minors, ANTH 105 is not mentioned in their curriculum, making it a “hidden” prerequisite in the words of Provost Dixon.

19. Anthropology 232: Title change from Chinese Ethnography TO Native Voices: China, Today and Yesterday (revised course-title change, rotation change)

Rationale: Anth 232 is a new course that has been offered just once. The title change is for integrating it into the course series “Native Voices” already in place. The change in time offering is necessitated by the instructor’s new schedule of course rotation.

20. Anthropology 301: Title Change from Ethnography of Religion TO Religion, Society, and Culture. Rotation to Fall, odd years (revised course – title change & rotation)

Rationale: The old course title is not descriptive enough as far as the course contents are concerned. The change in time offering is necessitated by the instructor’s new schedule of course rotation.

21. Anthropology 304: Primate Behavior – change: no prereqs/course to Anth 233/Spring, even years (revised course – prereq./level/rotation)

1. Rationale: Due to the proposed change (see accompanying course change proposal) whereby “ANTH 204: Human adaptation and variation” would be offered once per year (as opposed to once every other year), Primate Behavior will now be offered every other year to compensate.

2. While the workload and expectations are beyond the 100-level, the introductory nature of the course precludes the subject matter\expectations being at the 300-level.

3. While a portion of ANTH 105 involves primates, the material/expectations are at a superficial level. Since it is usually the students’ first introduction to most primate species, they do not retain the material in a manner that would allow them to proceed in ANTH 304 (now ANTH 233) at a point that assumes proficiency in most areas of primatology, especially taxonomy.

22. Anthropology 309: Topics in Primatology – prereq. Anth 233 and offered spring, odd years (revised course – prereq./rotation)

1. Rationale: The rotation has been changed so that this course alternates with primate behavior: Primate behavior will be offered spring of even years and this advanced 309 course will be offered spring of odd years.

2. A change in the course number of the prerequisite is proposed (see ANTH 304 proposal)

23. Asian Studies Minor: Adding Anth 232 as a choice to the minor (revised minor – add choice)

Rationale: Taught by Professor Zhiming Zhao, a specialist in Chinese folk religions and kinship, ANTH 232 (Native Voices: China) has been offered at Geneseo for two years. Focusing on the kinship system built on Confucianism and the “gift economy” as a historical product of the kinship system, the course illustrates the unity and diversity of Chinese culture. It looks into a constellation of economic, social, and political changes that have shaped different social groups in China since 1949. With an emphasis on the metamorphosis of Chinese society over time, the course will not only fit well into the Asian Studies minor program, but also add a new dimension to the minor program by exposing students to the growing literature on Chinese culture and society. Along with the existing courses included in the minor program, ANTH 232 will attract more students to the minor program and increase students’ interest in learning about Asian cultures and societies. (Supporting document: Syllabus of ANTH 232, Spring 2003)

24. ENVR 124: Environmental Issues (revised course – description)

Rationale: The revised course description more adequately reflects the approach and objectives of current instructors.

25. ENVR 395: Environmental Internship – increased opportunities (revised course – description)

Rationale: The revised course description no longer limits students to an internship with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, and thus increases their opportunities for arranging environmental internships.

Minutes: Graduate Academic Affairs Committee, October 23, 2003

Members present: G. Gouvernet, A. Jassawalla, S. Landes, D. Metz (Chair), M. Sutherland

Guests: Dean Bailey, Dennis Showers

Absent: K. Dalton-Ferris, J. Kirkwood

Meeting was called to order at 12:45

Dennis Showers made a brief presentation regarding three major secondary education program changes and one course change associated with one of the major program changes. All the proposed changes are an effort to satisfy the NYS Education Department’s revised guidelines for certification programs. The program and course changes are listed below. Following some brief clarifying questions, GAAC unanimously approved each of the three major program changes and the proposed changes for INTD 510. Full text versions are available in the Dean’s Office.

GAAC Proposal Summaries

(Full text proposals are available for review by contacting the office of the Dean of the College.)

Major Program Changes

Revised Program Description

Title

Master of Science in Education - Adolescence Education (French)

Revised or New Bulletin Description

Students who complete this program are eligible for New York State professional certification at the Adolescence level.

Each student’s program has three components as follows: (1) core areas of study in the nature of learning: philosophical and psychological foundations of education, and school and society (6 semester hours); (2) academic specialization course integrated with pedagogy: French (12 semester hours); (3) an elective component, selected by students in consultation with their advisor from the Department of Foreign Languages, to complement their academic specialization. Under advisement, courses in the liberal arts and sciences and/or education can be selected to enable students to gain greater depth in an area of specialization or broaden their background in related areas (15 semester hours).

Admission Requirements: Students must have completed the basic undergraduate courses required for the baccalaureate in the academic area in which they are seeking certification. Applicants also must have met requirements for initial certification in adolescence education prior to entering the program, as well as admission requirements of the College.

Credentials of applicants are reviewed by the School of Education and the respective academic department.

Candidates must demonstrate cultural, linguistic, and literary competencies in French which are clearly beyond the baccalaureate level. Speaking and writing proficiency must be at or above the Advanced Plus Level of Proficiency as described in the Proficiency Guidelines of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages.

Typical Pattern of Courses: The schedule below is worked out for full-time students. Part-time students would be expected to tailor their schedules according to the courses offered in this program, to meet their own needs.

First Summer: Educ 501, Elective under advisement

Fall Semester: Fren elective, Fren elective, Elective under advisement, Elective under advisement

Spring Semester: Fren elective, Fren elective, Elective under advisement, Elective under advisement

Second Summer: Educ 503, Elective under advisement

Typical Pattern of Courses to Fulfill Requirements of New or Revised Program

Educ 501, Educ 503; 12 credit hours in integrated pedagogy and French; 15 credit hours under advisement; successful completion of a comprehensive examination or a thesis in the target language under the guidance of a faculty advisor in the Department of Foreign Languages. The choice must be registered with the Director of the School of Education. Theses must conform to the guidelines approved by the College and the School of Education. Thesis format must conform to that prescribed by the MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing.

Revised Program Description

Title

Master of Science in Education - Adolescence Education (Spanish)

Revised or New Bulletin Description

Students who complete this program are eligible for New York State professional certification at the Adolescence level.

Each student’s program has three components as follows: (1) core areas of study in the nature of learning: philosophical and psychological foundations of education, and school and society (6 semester hours); (2) academic specialization course integrated with pedagogy: Spanish (12 semester hours); (3) an elective component, selected by students in consultation with their advisor from the Department of Foreign Languages, to complement their academic specialization. Under advisement, courses in the liberal arts and sciences and/or education can be selected to enable students to gain greater depth in an area of specialization or broaden their background in related areas (15 semester hours).

Admission Requirements: Students must have completed the basic undergraduate courses required for the baccalaureate in the academic area in which they are seeking certification. Applicants also must have met requirements for initial certification in adolescence education prior to entering the program, as well as admission requirements of the College.

Credentials of applicants are reviewed by the School of Education and the respective academic department.

Candidates must demonstrate cultural, linguistic, and literary competencies in Spanish which are clearly beyond the baccalaureate level. Speaking and writing proficiency must be at or above the Advanced Plus Level of Proficiency as described in the Proficiency Guidelines of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages.

Typical Pattern of Courses: The schedule below is worked out for full-time students. Part-time students would be expected to tailor their schedules according to the courses offered in this program, to meet their own needs.

First Summer: Educ 501, Elective under advisement

Fall Semester: Span elective, Span elective, Elective under advisement, Elective under advisement

Spring Semester: Span elective, Span elective, Elective under advisement, Elective under advisement

Second Summer: Educ 503, Elective under advisement

Typical Pattern of Courses to Fulfill Requirements of New or Revised Program

Educ 501, 503; 12 credit hours in integrated pedagogy and Spanish; 15 credit hours electives under advisement; successful completion of a comprehensive examination or a thesis in the target language under the guidance of a faculty advisor in the Department of Foreign Languages. The choice must be registered with the Director of the School of Education. Theses must conform to the guidelines approved by the College and the School of Education. Thesis format must conform to that prescribed by the MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing.

Revised Program Description

Title

Master of Science in Education - Adolescence Education (Mathematics)

Revised or New Bulletin Description

Students who complete this program are eligible for New York State professional certification for teaching mathematics at the Adolescence level. Each student’s program has four components as follows: (1) core areas of study in the nature of learning, philosophical and psychological foundations of education, school and society and methods of research (9 semester hours); (2) academic specialization course integrated with pedagogy: Mathematics and Seminar on Secondary School Mathematics and Pedagogy (15 semester hours); (3) a research project (3-6 semester hours) conducted under the supervision of a faculty member from the Department of Mathematics or the School of Education; (4) an elective component, selected by students in consultation with their advisor, to complement their academic specialization. Under advisement, courses in the liberal arts and sciences and/or education can be selected to enable students to gain greater depth in an area of specialization or broaden their background in related areas (3-6 semester hours).

Admission requirements: Students must have completed the basic undergraduate courses required for the baccalaureate in Mathematics. This should include the calculus and at least one course in each of the following areas: algebra (modern algebra, linear algebra, etc.); analysis (advanced calculus, elementary functions, real variables, etc.); geometry (foundations of geometry, non-Euclidean geometry, advanced Euclidean geometry, etc.); probability and/or statistics (calculus oriented).

Applicants almost must have met requirements for initial certification in adolescence education prior to entering the program, as well as admission requirements of the College.

Credentials of applicants are reviewed by the School of Education and the Department of Mathematics.

Typical Pattern of Courses to Fulfill Requirements of New or Revised Program

Educ 501; Educ 503; Educ 504; Educ 5xx (Seminar on Secondary School Mathematics and Pedagogy), research project (3-6 credit hours); electives under advisement (3-6 credit hours); 12 hours of Math electives from the following: Math 421, 432, 433, 435, 436, 437, 460, 470, 475, 499

New Course Description

Course Subject,

Number and Title

Intd 510, Seminar on Secondary School Mathematics and Pedagogy

Bulletin Description
(include prerequisites and number of credit hours)

This course, which is intended for the graduate student enrolled in the M.S. in Education - Mathematics program, has two major components: (1) to provide a bridge between the college level mathematics required of the mathematics major and the mathematics in the secondary school curriculum and (2) to provide the first part of the integrated capstone experience of the program (the second part is the research project). The major focus of the course will be on selected mathematical topics from the secondary school curriculum and the pedagogical implications of instruction in reading, writing, listening, and speaking in the content area as well as strategies for modifying content for use with students having special needs.

(3 cr. hours)

Policy Statement Regarding Midterm Grade Reporting for First Semester Transfer Students

The subcommittee on undergraduate academic Policies, core and review

of college senate has considered a recommendation from Susan Bailey, Dean of the College, to assign midterm grades to first semester transfer students as well as freshman. The policy committee unanimously recommends the following change to the wording in the Undergraduate Bulletin:

Information in [bold] to be added:

At the midpoint of the fall and spring semesters, instructors report the academic achievement of freshmen [and first semester transfer students] to the Director of Records. Freshmen [and first semester transfer students] receive a “Mid-Semester Grade Report” (on the web) and are advised to review their status with their academic advisors. This grade information is distributed to advisors. The Dean sends a warning letter, expressing concern and offering suggestions, to any freshman earning a grade of less than “C” in any course.

The rationale and discussion can be found in the minutes of the 10/21/03 meeting of the committee on undergraduate academic policies, core and review, printed in page ** of the Bulletin.

Proposed Changes to General Education Committee Charge and Membership

To: Provost Gordon

From: Paul Schacht, Chair, General Education Committee

Date: 20 August 2003

Re: Proposed Changes to General Education Committee Charge and Membership

Introduction

This memo contains two separate proposals. The first, concerning the charge of the General Education Committee, is made by the Chair. The second, concerning the membership of the Committee, is made by the 2002-2003 Committee as a whole. The second is identical in content to the proposal made in my memo to you dated 28 July 2003.

Proposed Change to Committee Charge

Under Article X of the Geneseo Senate Constitution, “The functions of the General Education Committee will be to review all issues relative to general education and oversee core area committees. The committee shall make recommendations for action or policy initiatives to the appropriate committee/s of the College Senate and to the Provost and President.”

The proposed new charge would read: “The functions of the General Education Committee shall be (1) to oversee the General Education curriculum, (2) to continuously assess the effectiveness of that curriculum, and (3) to consider innovations that might further strengthen the congruence of that curriculum with best practices in higher education and the mission and goals of the College. In its oversight role, the Committee shall communicate its concerns directly to the General Education Area Committees and to the Dean of the College. In its assessment role, the Committee shall work in conjunction with the Assessment Planning Committee. In its development role, the Committee shall forward recommendations both to appropriate committees of the Senate and to the Provost and President.”

Justification

The Committee’s present functions are narrow and essentially reactive. The Committee oversees, not the curriculum itself, but a set of subordinate committees. It “reviews” poorly defined “issues” but is not forcefully encouraged to think ahead, innovate, and help lead the College toward a better future. The proposed new charge enumerates broader, more active, and better defined functions: to monitor the General Education curriculum itself, to undertake ongoing assessment of the curriculum, to measure the curriculum against clear standards (best practices, College mission and goals), and to seek out promising new directions in the pursuit of academic excellence.

Proposed Change to Membership Guidelines

Currently, Article X, Section 2 of the Constitution reads as follows:

a. Membership:

1. A member from the Provost's Office who will also Chair the General Education Committee.

2. Eight members of the teaching faculty who will serve staggered two-year terms.

3. One member from the Student Affairs Professional Staff who is appointed by the President for a two-year term.

4. One student member from the Academic Affairs Committee of Central Council who will serve a one-year term.

5. One student member (sophomore or junior) appointed by the Provost from a list of nominees submitted by the faculty and staff. Appointment term is two-years.

b. Selection of Teaching Faculty Members:

1. Two teaching Faculty will be appointed by the Provost for two-year terms.

2. One member will be a current or past Chair of the former Undergraduate Academic Affairs Committee or the current Undergraduate Curricula or Academic Policies, Core, and Review Committees. The appointment will be made by the College Senate Chair for a two-year term.

3. There will be five elected teaching Faculty. One member from Fine Arts, Humanities, Natural Sciences with Mathematics and Computer Science, Professional Programs, and Social Sciences. The term of office will be two years. In the spring of even years, starting in 1992, representatives from Natural Science with Mathematics and Computer Science and Professional Programs will be elected. In the Spring of odd years, starting in 1993, representatives from Fine Arts, Humanities, and Social Science will be elected. The slate of nominees for these elections will be prepared by members of the academic groupings in the manner of their choice.

The Committee proposes the following changes:

· Committee membership for the faculty chiefly responsible for each of the Gen Ed areas: Natural Science, Social Science, Fine Arts, Western Humanities, Non-Western Traditions, Critical Reading/Writing, Numeric/Symbolic Reasoning, U.S. History, and Foreign Language.

· Elimination of the two slots for Provost-appointed teaching faculty and the slot for a current or former Senate committee chair. (See items b1 and b2 above.)

Justification for Proposed Changes

The proposed changes to the Committee’s membership would help the Committee to carry out the proposed new charge described and justified above.

If the proposed new charge is rejected, the proposed membership changes would nevertheless improve the Committee’s ability to carry out its present charge to “review all issues relative to general education and oversee core area committees.”

In 1999, under the leadership of Dean Greenfield, the General Education Committee began work on local implementation of the SUNY General Education Requirement. The Core Area chairs regularly attended Committee meetings in 1999-2000 and 2000-2001, and their contribution to the development of an implementation plan proved invaluable. During the latter year, the Committee discussed the possibility of incorporating Core chairs into the Committee membership, and there was general agreement that such a change was desirable.

In Spring 2002, System Administration approved Geneseo’s Plan for the Assessment of General Education. The plan requires that each of the nine General Education areas at Geneseo report assessment data at three-year intervals. Successful execution of this plan demands two things: clear and regular communication between the Chair of the General Education Committee and the heads of the nine areas, and a continuous exchange of ideas and experiences among the heads themselves. Membership for the heads would facilitate this necessary communication and exchange.

As assessment results come in, and as Geneseo advances in its mission to maintain the highest standards of academic excellence, the General Education Committee should consider “loop-closing” revisions to the general education curriculum. (The proposed new charge described above would explicity direct the Committee to respond in this way.) The Committee has already begun discussing possible improvements to the U.S. History Requirement. But it would be fruitful for members to evaluate the whole of the general education curriculum as well as its parts. Does the curriculum adequately balance breadth with depth? Is it progressive, in the sense that courses within the curriculum build on one another and orient students toward overarching outcomes? Does it help students to become—in the words of the Association of American Colleges and Universities—“empowered, informed, and responsible” learners? It is difficult to imagine how the Committee could effectively address such questions without the active participation of the nine area heads.

Since adding nine new members to the Committee would increase its overall size to a possibly unwieldy twenty-one, it is proposed to eliminate the seats for two Provost-appointed faculty members and a current or former Senate committee chair.

After the proposed changes, the Committee would have eighteen members: the Chair (appointed by the Provost), five elected representatives of the teaching faculty, two student representatives, one representative from Student Life, and the heads of the nine Gen Ed areas. The only drawback to incorporating the nine heads is the potentially unwieldy size of the resulting membership. But the benefits, particularly in conjunction with a re-defined charge, would more than offset this minor inconvenience.

University Faculty Senate Resolution on System Wide Assessment

October 25, 2003

The University Faculty Senate at its 135th Plenary Meeting in SUNY Oswego passed the following resolution.

Whereas, The University Faculty Senate has long supported University-wide campus-based assessment of General Education; and

Whereas, The SUNY System Administration has worked cooperatively with the University Faculty Senate and the Faculty Council of Community Colleges to establish the General Education Assessment Review (GEAR) committee to oversee the campus-based assessment process; and

Whereas, SUNY campuses have long-established quality General Education programs and implemented the GEAR-approved assessment plans, which Provost Salins called a “huge success” and a “remarkable accomplishment”; and

Whereas, Each SUNY campus is unique, having different missions, admissions standards, student populations, and means of satisfying the SUNY General Education requirements; and

Whereas, Accrediting bodies such as the Middle States Commission on Higher Education recognize the diversity of campus programs within a state system and assess the performance of the individual campuses and not the state-wide system; and

Whereas, National experts on assessment (e.g., Dr. Barbara Cambridge, former Director of Assessment for the American Association of Higher Education, and Dr. Peter Ewell, Senior Associate of the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems), and a recent report of the Institute for Higher Education Leadership and Policy of the California State University have argued that academic assessment is best done at the campus and not system level; and

Whereas, Dr. Candace Young reported at the 135th Plenary Meeting of the University Faculty Senate on the nature and success of the nationally recognized campus-based assessment program at Truman State University; and

Whereas, The specific requirement in the draft Memorandum of Understanding on Value-Added Assessment (September 26, 2003) for common measures across the campuses of SUNY would undermine fundamental principles of academic excellence by discouraging pedagogical creativity and innovation; and

Whereas, General Education occurs over a student’s entire academic career, and since students take individually diverse pathways through the available educational programs, including coursework at other institutions of higher education, internships, and study abroad programs, attempting to test this diversity in the manner proposed in the draft Memorandum of Understanding on Value-Added Assessment (September 26, 2003) is academically unwise and unsound; and

Whereas, The costs of such a program would be considerable and would have to come from SUNY’s zero-sum budget in an economic environment that already restricts the ability of campuses to carry out their academic missions; and

Whereas, The June 17 Resolution on Assessment of Student Leaning Outcomes of the Board of Trustees has offered no academically compelling reasons, evidence or problems that warrant its approach to assessment; therefore

Be it resolved that the University Faculty Senate respectfully requests that the Board of Trustees suspend implementation of its June 17 Resolution on Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes in order to engage in a substantial dialog among representatives of the Provost’s Office, the Board of Trustees, and faculty governance regarding University-wide campus-based assessment;

Be it further resolved that the University Faculty Senate cannot support the proposed Memorandum of Understanding on Value-Added Assessment dated September 26, 2003 but does support an ongoing discussion which will produce a mutually acceptable process of University-wide campus-based assessment;

Be it further resolved that the University Faculty Senate reaffirms its long-standing commitment to University-wide campus-based assessment, and will urge campuses to continue to implement their GEAR-approved General Education assessment plans; and

Be it further resolved that in the best interests of the education of our students, and the State University of New York, the University Faculty Senate invites the Board of Trustees and SUNY System Administration to continue to discuss the assessment of foundational skills in General Education. This may include externally referenced measures of the campus’s choice that provides for campus responsibility and System Administration oversight.

Sense of the Senate in Regard to Assessment and Accountability

Adopted by the SUNY University Faculty Senate, October 25, 2003 at the 135th Plenary session at the State University College at Oswego.

The faculty of the State University of New York has always supported both assessment and accountability. Both are a routine part of academic life and faculty responsibilities. In fact, the faculty has participated through the University Faculty Senate and the Faculty Council of Community Colleges with System Administration (specifically, with the Office of the Provost) to set up system-wide programs of assessment (GEAR—General Education Assessment Review) and accountability (Campus MOU—Memorandums of Understanding). These have been among the most recent successful examples of how the faculty and administration can cooperate to the benefit of SUNY.

The primary focus of the faculty has always been the quality of its academic programs. This campus-based responsibility for academic programs has been consistently understood and accepted by the University Faculty Senate, the Faculty Council of Community Colleges, System Administration, and the Board of Trustees, most evident recently in the programs of General Education. While there are system-wide learning objectives for ten categories of general education programs, the actual academic programs that serve to meet the requirements for general education as specified by the Board of Trustees Resolution 98-241 vary by campus. In fact, it is this very diversity of programs (general education and others—e.g., majors and various professional programs) that is the great strength of the SUNY system.

Consequently, it seems clear that in the six or more years in which this discussion about system-wide testing (now called “value-added assessment”) has occurred, the faculty has consistently argued that since academic programs are determined by the individual campuses, any assessment of these programs must be similarly campus-based. It seemed evident that System Administration agreed with that view when it worked with the University Faculty Senate and the Faculty Council of Community Colleges to establish GEAR to provide system-wide review of campus-based programs assessing general education. All current evidence suggests that the results of this process have been quite successful. Similarly, the campus MOUs were conceived within the context of perhaps the single most important contribution of the Provost: Mission Review. Mission Review is an explicit statement of the differences that do and should exist among the campuses of SUNY. Each campus is encouraged to find its own academic niche within SUNY and to provide programs relevant to its uniqueness. The campus MOU asks the campus to spell out precisely what its specific educational mission is and then requires it to demonstrate how well it has carried out that responsibility.

Looked at from this perspective, it is evident that there already exists within SUNY several mechanisms that speak to the issues of assessment and accountability: GEAR and the Campus MOU. These mechanisms provide for system-wide oversight of campus-based responsibilities. In addition, professional accreditation (as specific as those required by disciplinary professional societies or as general as required by the Middle States Higher Education Commission) also provides a mode of assessment and accountability, though again either at the department/college/school level (disciplinary accreditation) or at the campus but not the system level (Middle States).

Thus, if the intent of the present initiative on system-wide (or value-added) assessment is to serve primarily as a way of enhancing the quality of academic programs, the mechanisms to do so currently exist (GEAR, MOU, and professional accreditation). It would certainly be appropriate, and in keeping with the concept of “value added,” to assess the degree to which campuses continually improve their academic programs over time. In that way, campuses are compared against themselves rather than against other campuses that have a different mix of students, clearly different academic programs, and different goals for their students. If the current GEAR process and the MOUs are perceived to be inadequate to the task of value-added assessment, though we do not see why that should be, the faculty governance bodies will gladly work with System Administration to modify these two existing processes that have already been accepted by both the faculty and System Administration to ensure the necessary campus-based responsibility for assessing its academic programs and system-wide need for accountability without creating a new set of mechanisms that the faculty opposes on academic, pragmatic, and fiscal grounds.

Minutes: Undergraduate Curriculum Committee, October 28, 2003

The meeting was called to order at 4:00 in Milne 213 by Chair C. Klima.

Members Attending: C. Klima (chair), E.Spicka, B. Owens, Z. Zhao, J. Cope, O. Nicodemi, G. Towsley, A. Weibel, A. Stanley, K. Hurst, A. Kline, J. Giordano, M. Levis, D. Sullivan, S. Brainard and I. Bosch.

Visitors: A. Eisenberg, R. Hartmann, R. McEwen, M. Teres, J. Johnston, J. Williams C. Woidat, D. Aagesen, J. Rogalsky, J. Ballard.

The following new courses, course revisions, course deletions, and program revisions were passed by the committee.

ANTH 208 (revision)
ANTH 313 (new course)
ANTH 393 (revision)
ARTH 172 (revision)

ARTH 173 (new course, F/ Core)

ARTH 201 (revision)
ARTH 202 (revision)
ARTH 378 (new course)
ARTH 379 (new course)
ARTS 235 (revision)
ARTS 335 (revision)
ARTS 365 (revision)
Art History BA (revision)
Conflict Studies Minor (revision)

DANC 211 (revision, F/ Core)

Early Childhood, Childhood, Childhood w/ Special Ed (program revision)

(add minimum competency in MATH 140, 141)
ENGL 239 (new course)
ENGL 336 (new course)
Environmental Studies Minor (revision)
GEOG 260 (deletion)
GEOG 382 (new course)
GEOG 375 (revision)
GEOG 386 (new course)
HIST 214 (new course)
HIST 232 (new course)
HIST 352 (revision)

HIST 362 (new course, M/ Core)-passed M/ Core Committee

PHIL 103 (deletion)

PHIL 105 (Deletion)
PSYC 340 (revision)
PSYC 360 (revision)
SOCL 375 (deletion)
SOCL 376 (new course)
SOCL 377 (new course)
SOCL 378 (new course)
SOCL 379 (new course)
SPAN 313 (revision) (passed with minor changes)

SPAN 314 (new course, M/ Core) (passed with minor changes)

SPAN 325 (revision) (passed with minor changes)

SPAN 326 (revision) (passed with minor changes)

Spanish, BA, (revision to include SPAN 314)

Education BS, Spanish concentration (revision to include SPAN 314)

International Relations Major (revision to include SPAN 314)

Latin American Studies Minor (revision to include SPAN 314)
Theatre, BA (revision to include THEA 347)
THEA 290 (revision, F/ Core)

In the evaluation procedures the word attendance was changed to participation
The following sentence was added to each of the description of each of the following courses: THEA 100, 140, 200, 203, 221, 305, 311, 320, 330, 340

Attendance at on-campus theatrical performances will be required,"
The following sentence was added to each of the description of each of the following courses: THEA 204, DANC 211

“Attendance at on-campus theatrical performances may be required,"

Urban Studies minor (revision)

BIOL 370 (deletion)

BIOL 373 (deletion)

CHEM 210 (deletion)

EDUC 381 (deletion)

EDUC 338 (deletion)

GEOG 260 (deletion)

H&PE 103 (deletion)

H&PE 109 (deletion)

H&PE 115 (deletion)

H&PE 121 (deletion)

H&PE 122 (deletion)

H&PE 136 (deletion)

H&PE 138 (deletion)

H&PE 206 (deletion)

H&PE 215 (deletion)

H&PE 218 (deletion)

H&PE 221 (deletion)

H&PE 222 (deletion)

H&PE 223 (deletion)

H&PE 224 (deletion)

H&PE 242 (deletion)

HIST 201 (deletion)

HIST 317 (deletion)

MUSC 230 (deletion)

PHIL 102 (deletion)

PHIL 206 (deletion)

UCC Proposal Summaries Considered at UCC meeting on October 28, 2003

(Full text proposals are available for review at http://www.geneseo.edu/~doc/ucc/forms.shtml.)

Anth 208 – Classics of Ethnography – change description/add prereqs of Anth 100 or 101/delete S/core (revised course – description/prereq./core)

Rationale: The course is designed for majors and the work requires some background

in the subject.

Anth 313 – Global Health Issues – new course

Rationale: As more of our students want to enter the health related professions or work in development related fields, they will be interested in courses that explore the relationship between health and globalization. This seminar will introduce students to cutting edge research and methodologies and invite them to reflect on the social, political, and economic effects of disease and epidemics on communities and on nations. Teaching methods will include experiential and cognitive approaches such as the use of research tools and the fundamentals of Epidemiology. Guest lectures by medical anthropologists and epidemiologists, library training in web-based research tools will complement readings and discussions.

Anth 393 – Honors Research/Writing (revised course – requirements/description)

Rationale: Raising the GPA requirement will enable the honors to be more prestigious and fit better into the college honors guidelines.

ARTH 172 – Title change to: History of Western Art: Renaissance through Rococo (revised course – title/description)

Rationale: See Mark Denaci’s proposal for ARTH 173

ARTH 173 – F/History of Western Art: Neoclassicism to Contemporary (new course)

Rationale: Because of the vast time period covered by the existing 172 survey course, students get very limited exposure to important trends in contemporary art. Since the survey courses are the only Art History classes that many students take (especially in their first several years of college), a need to increase students’ exposure to modern and contemporary art at the introductory level has arisen, particularly in studio art classes. Many universities have been responding to this problem by dividing the traditional Renaissance-to-Contemporary survey into two classes, and with three art historians the Art Department now has that opportunity. The periods covered are still broad enough for an introductory survey course, but give students a broader range of choices at the 100-level.

ARTH 201 – Ancient to Byzantine Art: Religion and Philosophy – add prereq. of Arth 171 (revised course – prereq.)

Rationale: Because this course is unique in the college curriculum in terms of covering material on the Ancient World, students lacking the background provided by (at least) ARTH 171 have a difficult time with the material as they tend to be unfamiliar with Ancient history, mythology, philosophy, religious rituals, literature and the daily life of the Ancient world from the Sumerians to the Byzantine world. IN addition, once Christianity is reached, the students lack the background to understand theological developments reflected in art, unless they have taken the general survey. There are, of course, always some students who have enough background, hence, permission of the instructor can be applied to those outstanding students who have not taken ARTH 171; but are, nonetheless, prepared to advance in this material.

ARTH 202 – Crusaders, Saints & Sinners: Art & Spirituality in Medieval Europe – add prereq. of Arth 171 (revised course – prereq.)

Rationale: In the past, students who have taken this course without benefit of having taken ARTH171 have had a difficult time sorting out the background material which accompanies the development of Medieval Art, such as: theological developments in Early Christianity, the continuing influence of the pagan mystery cults, the rebellion in styles, the incursion of the Vandals, Gots, Visigoths, Lombards into Western Europe, the dogmatic wars in Byzantium, the philosophical developments of Neoplatonism, Arianism, Donatism and their manifestation in artistic form and the Gothic transformation to a metaphysical Augustinian Neoplatonism which led to the building of the great cathedrals of Europe. For the exceptional student who has acquired this background, permission of the instructor will allow them access to the course.

ARTH 378 – Museum Studies I: History and Theory of Museums (new course)

Rationale: This course forms the first half of a two-course sequence in Museum Studies. The Museum Studies program is designed to take advantage of opportunities provided by the new Lockhart Gallery and the SUNY Geneseo permanent art collection, both housed in the McClellan House. This seminar-based course introduces Museum Studies as an important field of study within the liberal arts tradition: while art historians and other scholars have traditionally applied considerable scrutiny to the various objects displayed in museums, only recently has attention been given to museums themselves and to the ways in which our understanding of cultural objects may be affected by their modes of display. Students successfully completing this course may move on to Museum Studies II, dealing more directly with the practice(s) of gallery management, and to directed internships in the Lockhart and other galleries.

ARTH 379 – Museum Studies II: Practical and Theoretical Aspects of Gallery Management (new course)

Rationale: This course forms the second half of a two-course sequence in museum studies. Building on the foundations laid in Museum Studies 1, Museum Studies 2 offers students the opportunity for closely supervised experience in all aspects of putting on gallery exhibitions and caring for and managing a permanent art collection. All of this practical experience takes place in conjunction with a series of readings designed to offer an intellectual context for the more hands-on activities. This two-course sequence is essential for students interested in museum or gallery careers, and provides a training ground for gallery interns during those years in which the course is not offered.

ARTS 235 – Title change from: Photography I TO Digital Photography (revised course – title/description)

Rationale: Photography at Geneseo has been evolving toward the digital frontier for many years. This summer, for a variety of reasons, Geneseo discontinued the use of chemical photography in favor of a completely digital facility. All of the material usually covered in Photography One (chemical photography) will, to the best of our ability, be taught in Digital Photography One. New digital only opportunities in photography will be introduced at the beginning level in the Photography One class. Photography is going digital and we are going with it.

ARTS 335 – Title Change from: Photography II TO Digital Photography II (revised course-title/description)

Rationale: Photography at Geneseo has been evolving toward the digital frontier for many years. This summer, for a variety of reasons, Geneseo discontinued the use of chemical photography in favor of a completely digital facility. All of the material usually covered in Photography Two (chemical photography) will, to the best of our ability, be taught in Digital Photography. New digital only photographic opportunities will be introduced at the advanced level in the Photography Two class. Photography is going digital and we are going with it.

ARTS 365 – Junior Portfolio Review TO Arts 265 – Foundation Portfolio Review (revised course - # change)

Rationale: Arts 365 will be replaced with a new course Arts 265.

B.A. in Art History – Add Arth 173 to list of choices and revise 300-level to (300, 305, 310, 378, 379, 384)

Rationale: ArtH 173 is being offered as an additional alternative for Studio/Art History Majors/Minors and as another choice for core curriculum students along with ArtH 171 and ArtH 172; the second list gives the new courses and a more comprehensive list of courses available to the Majors/Minors.

Conflict Studies Minor – Delete Anth 225 and Mgmt 261/Anth 230 course number change to Anth 120/Hist 252 replaced to Hist 265 (revised minor – course changes)

Rationale:

1.The course deletions of Anth 225 and Mgt 261has already been approved in the College Senate.

2.College Senate approval of course number change of Anth 230 to Anth 120.

3.Course replacement of Hist 252 by Hist 265 approved by College Senate.

Therefore, the changes requested in this proposal merely reflect the need to update the current description of the Conflict Studies Minor to mirror actions previously approved by the College Senate.

DANC 211 – Content expanded to include classical, modern, & folk/change in description/addF/core credit (revised course – syllabus/description/core)

Rationale:

• CHANGE IN SYLLABUS: The content of Dance 211 has been expanded to include classical, modern, and folk traditions of East Asia (China, Korea, Japan), North Central Asia (Bhutan, Nepal, Tibet), and Polynesia in addition to its original emphasis on South and Southeast Asia (India, Cambodia, Thailand, Vietnam, Laos, Malaysia, Indonesia, and the Phillippines).

• CHANGE IN DESCRIPTION: See above.

• CHANGE IN CORE CREDIT: Add “F-Core” credit to currently existing “M-Core”

Dance 211 addresses the mission(s) of the Geneseo fine arts core in that it

• focuses on the broad range of artistic experience, expression, and techniques which are integral aspects of Asian dance performance, including movement and costume and mask design;

• considers Asian dance pedagogy in terms of its impact on performers;

• requires students to develop understandings of the diverse roles of both dancers and choreographers and their audiences relative to these unique dance forms and the societies in which they flourish;

• emphasizes connections between the performing arts and their socio-political, historical, and religious contexts.

DELETION OF COURSE NOT OFFERED IN FIVE YEARS OR MORE:

BIOL 370 Cell Biology

BIOL 373 Laboratory in Cell Biology

CHEM 210 Principles of Organic Chemistry

EDUC 381 Foundations of Education

EDUC 338 Mainstr: Rdg for Exceptional Learners

GEOG 260 European culture & Society

H&PE 103 Swimming & Diving

H&PE 109 Track & Field

H&PE 115 Badminton

H&PE 121 Synchronized Swimming

H&PE 122 Foil Fencing

H&PE 136 Lacrosse

H&PE 138 Ice Hockey

H&PE 206 Advanced Gymnastics

H&PE 215 Advanced Badminton

H&PE 218 Advanced Tennis

H&PE 221 Advanced Synchronized Swimming

H&PE 222 Advanced Foil Fencing

H&PE 223 Advanced Square Dance

H&PE 224 Advanced Folk Dance

H&PE 242 Advanced Ice Skating

HIST 201 The Historical Process

HIST 317 Age of Louis XIV

MUSC 230 Sound and Synthesis

PHIL 102 Philosophy Through Literature

PHIL 206 Medieval Philosophy

Early Childhood, Childhood Education, & Childhood with Special Education To include Math 140 and Math 141 as courses that need to meet minimum competence requirements in Early Childhood, Childhood Education, & Childhood with Special Education (revised major)

Rationale: Prospective elementary school teachers need to learn a broad range of elementary mathematics from an advanced perspective. We expect our future teachers to be more than marginal (grade D) in each of the areas they will be responsible for teaching. In concurrence with the U.S. Department of Education’s National Commission on Excellence in Education report, “A Nation at Risk”: Graduation requirements should be strengthened so that all students establish a foundation in five new basics: English, mathematics, science, social studies, and computer science; Schools and colleges should adopt higher and measurable standards for academic performance; The teaching profession should be strengthened through higher standards for preparation and professional growth.

ENGL 239 – American Visions (subtitle) (new course)

Rationale: Current 200-level course offerings by the Department of English are limited, particularly in the field of American literature and culture. Sections of ENGL 239 would be especially attractive to the general population of students who wish to explore some particular aspect of the American experience rather than to study American literature through a more traditional survey course.

ENGL 336 – American Ways (subtitle) (new course)

Rationale: The regularly scheduled 300-level courses in American literature tend to be organized according to traditional chronological period (e.g., American Romanticism, Modern American Literature, etc.) This arrangement is not well suited to some thematically based approaches to subject matter (Puritan thought in the American tradition, for instance, or attitudes toward the wilderness and the frontier), nor to a concentration on certain materials (American autobiography or African-American film). Regularly available slot courses would encourage our Americanist faculty to apply their current research to imaginative course offerings, broadening choices available to English majors and Geneseo students interested in advanced study of American literature and culture.

Environmental Studies Minor – Adding nine courses as options/movement of Engl 250 from third level to second level/five course title changes (revised minor)

Rationale:

Course Additions:

Adding the proposed courses (GSci 105, GSci 210, Biol 305, Econ 355, Geog 351, Geog 371, Geog 382, GSci 348, and Hist 369) will align the Environmental Studies minor with current course offerings. It will also provide students with more options. Some courses in the minor are taught on an irregular basis and others may not be taught in the near future as some departments adapt to recent retirements and/or new faculty interests. Please note that Biol 305, Hist 369, and Geog 382 are currently pending UCC/Senate approval.

Movement of Engl 250 from third level to second level:

This ensures that all 200-level courses are in the second level of the minor, just as 100-level courses are in the first level and 300-level courses are in the third level.

Course Titles:

The course titles (as listed in the requirements for the Environmental Studies minor) for Geog 370, Geog 380, GSci 333, GSci 315, and GSci 347 should be changed in order to conform with course titles in the 2002-2004 Undergraduate Bulletin.

GEOG 260 – European Culture and Society (delete course)

Rationale: Course approved by Senate 12/7/93, in conjunction with the Univ. of Groningen, The Netherlands, Study Abroad program. The SUNY Geneseo/Groningen Study Abroad program is ongoing, but this summer offering is not needed. To be deleted

GEOG 382 – Climate Change and Variability (new course)

Rationale: The addition of Geog 382, Climate Change and Variability, will expand the Advanced Physical Geography course options available to students in Geography. This course will also serve the needs of students interested in global climate change issues.

GEOG 375 – Field Experience – may be repeated w/ permission of instructor only/only Geography majors/offered every year (revised course – description/prereq./rotation)

Rationale: Because Geog 375 is becoming a "Basic Requirement" of the B.A. Geography program, certain revisions now are required in the course description, prerequisites, and course rotation.

GEOG 386 – Applications in Geographic Information Science (GIScience): (subtitle) (new course)

Rationale: This course will expand and enhance the Department of Geography’s programs in Geographic Information Systems (GIS), cartography, and spatial analysis. With recent hires, the Department of Geography now has several faculty interested and qualified to teach GIScience courses. This course will not change or replace any existing courses, but rather add to our course offerings that develop geotechnical skills, giving students the opportunity to apply the knowledge they have learned in other geotechniques courses, such as GIS, remote sensing, cartography, quantitative methods, and others.

History 214 – British Isles: Four Nations in Contact and Conflict (new course)

Rationale: - This course provides students with the opportunity to learn about the history of the British Isles on site. Students will be resident in the provincial town of Exeter, will take a long field trip through Wales and Scotland, and will make short day trips to sites of historical and/or cultural interest.

- The broad regional approach that this course adopts reflects the current state of British historical scholarship. Rather than viewing the history of the Isles from a national (or more often, Anglo-centric) perspective, this approach allows students to focus on the challenges of ethnic, religious and cultural diversity within an historical context.

History 232 – Early Modern European Expansion (new course)

Rationale: - A course on the dynamics of European expansion reflects the current state of scholarship on early modern history. Increasingly, scholars conceptualize this as a period of intense cultural exchange, with profound impacts on both European and non-European populations. This course, although centered on Europeans, devotes significant attention to non-Western responses to European expansion, and incorporates a variety of texts from non-Western perspectives.

- This course was offered as an experimental section in the spring of 2003. The course had a full enrollment, and student SOFIs indicated a high degree of support for making this a permanent offering (100% of 38 students either agreed or strongly agreed that “this class is a valuable addition to existing history course offerings”.

History 352 – Title Change: History of Colonial Society to 1763 TO The English Atlantic World to 1763 (revised course – title/description)

Rationale: Change in title and course description reflects evolution in the field of early American history.

History 362 – History of the Iroquois: From Pre-Contact to Present (new course)

Rationale: Geneseo is named after a Seneca village located not far from our campus. Iroquois history is central to the history of our region and the state in general. Many of our students, moreover, will have first-hand exposure to many current events relating to the Iroquois, such as gambling issues, debates over taxation and sovereignty, and land claims, for which we should offer them some historical context. I have worked as a historical consultant for both the Tonawanda Band of Senecas and the Onondagas and my experiences in this regard, as well as my own research interests, make me well suited to offer so important a course.

Phil 103 – Minds, Dreams and Machines/Phil 105 – Philosophy of Education (delete courses)

Rationale: None of these courses has been offered in the near past and none of them is likely to be offered in the foreseeable future.

Psyc 340 – Psychology of Learning – change credits from 3 (2-2) to 3(3-0) (revised course – credit)

Rationale: The proposed change in credits reflects current practice. The course has not been taught as a lecture/lab for many years.

Psyc 360 – Abnormal Psychology – change to Psyc 260/add prereq. of Psyc 100 (revised course – prereq./# change)

Rationale: We propose two changes: 1) renumber Psyc 360 to Psyc 260; 2) change the prerequisites from 6 hours in Psychology to Psyc 100.

Renumbering the course is appropriate for several reasons. First, many students currently take the course at a community college and then receive transfer credit at the 300-level. Changing the course number to the 200-level will equalize the level of credit received by transfers and original students. Second, it is difficult for us to offer Psyc 360 at the same level as our other 300-level courses. One reason is that the current Psyc 360 does not have the same prerequisites as our other 300-level courses (specifically, Psyc 250 Statistics and Psyc 251 Research Methods). Students therefore cannot be expected to complete critical reading and writing assignments that presuppose skills taught in those courses. Third, the course content of Abnormal Psychology is prerequisite for other 300-level courses, such as Clinical Psychology and Developmental Psychopathology. Requiring one 300-level course as a prerequisite for another is counterintuitive and could increase the time pressure for students to complete the sequence. Recently, the Psyc 360 requirement for Psyc 366 has often been waived because of such problems. Renumbering the course would prevent having to do so. Finally, the Abnormal Psychology course is taught at most undergraduate institutions at the introductory (sophomore) level, and most textbooks in Abnormal Psychology can be considered introductory. Therefore, changing the course number will bring our practices in line with common practice.

The proposed change in prerequisites will make the course comparable to our other 200-level courses.

An additional benefit of changing the course number and prerequisites for Abnormal Psychology is that students will have another 200-level course from which to choose.

Socl 375 – Seminar in Sociological Inquiry (delete course)

Rationale: In the past three to four years, several key concerns about senior seminar surfaced.

1. The first concern about senior seminar is that the course description covers too many topics and makes it difficult, if not impossible, to teach the course as advertised.

2. Another concern was the lack of adequate staffing to continue offering the course every semester, along with providing enough 300-level courses for sociology majors as well as continuing to serve the college through the S/M/U courses (such as 100, 102, 105, and 241, among others).

3. A final point concerning senior seminar is that SUNY-Geneseo sociology students represent a wide range of interests and skills. Requiring all students to participate in one type of capstone course does not necessarily allow them to further develop their own individual strengths and interests (ranging from those who will teach, work in an applied field such as law enforcement, to those who will go on to graduate school).

Socl 376 – Senior Seminar: (Selected Topics) (new course)

Rationale: Having four classes (SOCL 376 being one of them) that fulfill the senior seminar requirement in Sociology does the following:

· provides a consistent standard no matter the option chosen, in that all options require submission of a culminating paper as well as a formal presentation.

· maintains the number of credit hours required for the sociology major.

· eliminates the staffing problem for the senior capstone experience by allowing any of the 11 faculty members to offer a senior capstone course (classroom, internship, study abroad, or thesis).

· allows students to select the approach best suited to their own strengths to satisfy the requirement.

Socl 377 – Senior Seminar: Internship Seminar (new course)

Rationale: Having four classes (SOCL 376 being one of them) that fulfill the senior seminar requirement in Sociology does the following:

· provides a consistent standard no matter the option chosen, in that all options require submission of a culminating paper as well as a formal presentation.

· maintains the number of credit hours required for the sociology major.

· eliminates the staffing problem for the senior capstone experience by allowing any of the 11 faculty members to offer a senior capstone course (classroom, internship, study abroad, or thesis).

· allows students to select the approach best suited to their own strengths to satisfy the requirement.

Socl 378 – Senior Seminar: Study Abroad (new course)

Rationale: Having four classes (SOCL 376 being one of them) that fulfill the senior seminar requirements in Sociology does the following:

- provides a consistent standard no matter the option chosen, in that all options require submission of a culminating paper as well as a formal presentation.

- Maintains the number of credit hours required for the sociology major.

- Eliminates the staffing problem for the senior capstone experience by allowing any of the 11 faculty members to offer senior capstone course (classroom, internship, study abroad, or thesis.)

- Allows students to select the approach best suited to their own strengths to satisfy the requirement.

Socl 379 – Senior Thesis (new course)

Rationale: Having four classes (SOCL 376 being one of them) that fulfill the senior seminar requirement in Sociology does the following:

· provides a consistent standard no matter the option chosen, in that all options require submission of a culminating paper as well as a formal presentation.

· maintains the number of credit hours required for the sociology major.

· eliminates the staffing problem for the senior capstone experience by allowing any of the 11 faculty members to offer a senior capstone course (classroom, internship, study abroad, or thesis).

· allows students to select the approach best suited to their own strengths to satisfy the requirement.

Span 313 – Change title from Contemporary Civilization TO Contemporary Spanish Civilization (revised course – title/description) WITH CHANGES TO SYLLABUS

Rationale: See explanation in proposal for new course SPAN 314.

Span 314 – M/Contemporary Spanish-American Civilization (new course – also add M/core)

Rationale: Span 314 will alternate with Span 313 to allow teaching of both Spanish and Latin American Civilization. WITH CHANGES TO SYLLABUS

1. As the course titles and descriptions stand now, only Span 326 specifically indicates the geographical area of the course's focus. For Span 313 and Span 325 the Bulletin only specifies that the focus will be a "target (language) country." In the past, that "country" has been either Spain or Latin America, as determined by the area of specialization of the faculty member assigned to teach the course. Unless (and even if) the Schedule specifies the target area of one of these courses, our students as well as some faculty in other departments have difficulty determining those courses' content. This leads to confusion, especially when a program, such as the Third World Track of the International Relations minor, requires that elective courses deal specifically with Third World countries.

2. There is a need to specify more clearly that our civilization courses are organized by two historical periods:

¨ Contemporary civilization;

¨ Civilization from its origins to the present.

3. No civilization course in Spanish is offered during Spring, even years.

Span 325 – Change title from Civilization TO Spanish Civilization (revised course – title/description)

Rationale: See explanation in proposal for new course SPAN 314.

Span 326 – M/Spanish-American Civilization – changing the first few words of the first sentence (revised course – description)

Rationale: See explanation in proposal for new course SPAN 314.

Bachelor of Arts in Spanish – Include Span 314 – Contemporary Spanish-American Civ as one of the courses that can meet the culture and civilization requirements. (revised major)

Rationale: Please note that the only change we propose is to include Span 314 - M/Contemporary Spanish-American Civilization (a proposed new course) as one of the courses that can meet the culture and civilization requirements of the Bachelor of Arts Degree in Spanish (please refer to Span 314 new course proposal).

Education Majors – To include Span 314 (Cont Span-Amer Civ) as one of the courses that can meet the Spanish Concentration (revised major)

Rationale: Please note that the only change we propose is to include Span 314 – M/Contemporary Spanish-American Civilization (a proposed new course) as one of the courses that can meet the Spanish concentration requirements of the Bachelor of Science Degree in Education (please refer to Span 314 new course proposal)

International Relations – Adding Span 314 to Developing World Track and Geog 365 to Developing World Track and War and Peace Trace (revised major).

Rationale: Department of Foreign Languages has altered its offerings in Spanish to include a new course, SPAN 314 Contemporary Spanish-American Civilization, which focuses on Latin America and enhances the offerings in the Developing World track. The Department of Geography has implemented a new course, GEOG 365 Geography of Islam, which enhances the selections in the War and Peace Studies and Developing World tracks.

Latin American Studies Minor – Reflect current course offerings/reducing the minor requirements (revised minor – requirements)

Rationale: The rationale for presenting this proposal is the need for the Latin American Studies program:

(1) To update the 2004-2006 Bulletin so that it reflects current course offerings related to Latin American Studies as well as actual course titles;

(2) To ensure that Latin American studies are approached from a truly interdisciplinary perspective;

(3)To make the program competitive with other minors in area/ethnic studies (such as Africana Studies and American Studies) by reducing the minor requirements to a comparable number of semester hours.

Theater BA – Delete Thea 244 Stage Electrics & Sound and replace with Thea 347 Sound Design (revised major – requirements)

Rationale: SOPA has proposed the deletion of Thea. 244 and the establishment of a new course, Thea. 347, the entire focus of which is sound design for the theater.

Thea 290 – London Theater Seminar (revised course – add F/ and delete S/U grading) WITH CHANGE IN SYLLABUS FROM ATTENDANCE TO PARTICIPATION

Rationale: The London Theatre Seminar provides the best chance for the student to observe the best in theatre first-hand in the theatres in which the productions of the plays were created. They experience performances by the best actors working in straight plays (as opposed to musicals), and a fine performance must be experienced as it happens; it cannot be described. Theatre takes place in real time with live actors interacting with each other and with a live audience. There is no other course which replicates this experience.

We always have a back-stage tour of the Royal National Theatre’s extensive set and properties shops and that gives a glimpse into the process of creating the physical production. There is always at least one production under construction. At times, we have also seen sets being moved onto the stage, and actors warming up on stage prior to performance.

The students are also able to see well-known companies in action which otherwise remain only abstractions of learned history. In preparation for the trip to London, the Seminar meets and I give a brief outline of government support for the arts in Britain. I also discuss the three main subsidized London theatre companies: The English Stage Company at the Royal Court (I wrote the first book detailing the history of that company), the Royal National Theatre, and the Royal Shakespeare Company . We have also frequently visited the Theatre Royal in the working-class Stratford East, which achieved great fame under Joan Littlewood. We visit the Theatre Museum in Covent Garden, which opened only sixteen years ago. In addition, Ian Herbert, the President of the International Association of Theatre Critics and publisher of Theatre Reviews, visits and gives a rundown on the current state of theatre, including the function and support of the Arts Council. We tour the reconstructed Globe Theatre and the Shakespeare Museum, and the George, an old coaching inn of the type which provided the basic form of the outdoor public theatres in Shakespeare’s time. Because the Seminar will now take place in May, I will add a visit Stratford-upon-Avon, Shakespeare’s birthplace and gravesite, and attend a production at the Memorial Theatre or Swan Theatre there, if something suitable is playing.

The choice of plays is always wide-ranging. There is always at least one play by Shakespeare (and now that the Seminar will take place in May at least one of those plays will be seen in The Globe Theatre, an experience that cannot be replicated anywhere else.) There is always at least one classic from another period and there are always contemporary plays of quality. Sometimes, but not always, a musical production is included.

The daily discussions of the productions seen the day before provide an opportunity to test the student’s perceptions against those of others, to develop a sense of what to look for in a live production, and promote the ability to articulate one’s perceptions in writing in the required critical notebook.

Thea 100, Thea 140, Thea 200, Thea 203, Thea 221, Thea 305, Thea 311, Thea 320, Thea 330, Thea 340 (revised courses)

Please add the sentence, "Attendance at on-campus theatrical performances will be required," to the descriptions of the above theater courses.

Thea 204, Danc 211 (revised courses)

Please add the sentence, "Attendance at on-campus theatrical performances may be required" to Thea 204 and Danc 211.

Urban Studies Minor – Change in Requirements – Geog 201 moved to a basic requirement/heading changed to “at least 3 Electives”/Geog 295 added as elective/Econ 250 dropped (revised minor.)

Rationale:

Changes to Basic Requirements

q Geog 201: Should be moved from electives to basic requirements, increasing the basic requirements to 9 credits (from 6 credits) and reducing electives to 9 credits (from 12 credits). This course provides a background to the basic concepts, objectives, and institutions of urban planning and should be part of the core of the minor.

Course Title/Number Corrections

q PlSc 215: Course title has changed from Community, State, and Local Politics to Community, State, and Regional Politics

q PlSc 217: 216 was printed in error in last bulletin