For Immediate Release
Nov. 13, 2008

Contact:
David Irwin
Media Relations Manager
(585) 245-5516
Irwin@geneseo.edu

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             Metz

SUNY Geneseo Communicative Disorders and Sciences Professor Receives Highest Honor from Professional Association

GENESEO, N.Y. – The American Speech-Hearing-Language Association has awarded a SUNY Geneseo speech scientist its highest honor.   Dale Evan Metz, professor of communicative disorders and sciences, is one of five this year to receive Honors of the Association, which recognizes distinguished contributions to the field of speech, language and hearing.  Metz and his colleagues will receive the awards at ASHA’s annual convention in Chicago later this month.

ASHA is a professional, scientific and credentialing association with 140,000 members or affiliates, consisting of audiologists; speech-language pathologists; and speech, language and hearing scientists.

 Highly regarded in his field, Metz has conducted groundbreaking research as one of five original members of the Communication Research Department at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf at the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT).  His work has led to theoretical and clinical advances in normal speech and in speech production associated with deafness, hearing impairment and stuttering.  He also is recognized for his work on simultaneous communication, the use of both a spoken language and a manual variant for communication.

“Professor Metz’s findings on this topic…have moved the field from innuendo and anecdote to evidence-based practice in the management of children who are deaf,” said Edward Contur, professor of hearing and speech sciences at Vanderbilt University. 

Beyond research, Metz has won praises as a mentor and teacher.  He has encouraged students to participate in research activities and pursue doctoral degrees and frequently co-authors and co-presents with students.

“He has worked tirelessly for students, ASHA and for science,” said Anthony Caruso, professor emeritus at Kent State University.

Metz received a Distinguished Achievement Award from the New York State Speech Language Hearing Association in 1994 and the SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Research in 2005.  He earned his bachelor’s degree in speech pathology from Geneseo in 1970, his master’s degree from Purdue in 1972 and his doctorate from Syracuse in 1976.  Following his graduation from Geneseo, he was a practicing speech therapist and a teaching/research assistant before returning to Geneseo’s communicative disorders and sciences department faculty in 1974.  He joined the RIT faculty in 1977 and was named professor of communicative disorders and sciences at Geneseo in 1993.  In addition to his appointments at Geneseo and RIT, he has taught at Nazareth College in Rochester.

Metz has published extensively in his field with numerous papers, books or book chapters, and presentations to his credit.   His is editor of the publication “Contemporary Issues in Communicative Sciences and Disorders” and also edited “Journal of Speech and Hearing Research” from 1997-99.  He also has held numerous associate editorships and consulting editorships.

Metz resides in West Irondequoit, N.Y.

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