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Affiliation Policy

Alcohol and Illicit Drugs Policy

 Assembly Policy

Bias Crimes and the Law

Bias-Related Incident Reporting Procedures

Campaigning Policy 

Campus Administrative Rules for Students

Class Cancellation & Extraordinary Weather Conditions Policy

CIT Acceptable Use Policy

Consensual Sexual and Amorous Relations Policy

Credit Card Policy

Crime and Campus Safety

Damage Reports

Drug-Free School Information

Freedom of Information Policy

Greek Organizations - Statement of Relationship

Hazing Policy

 Immunization Policy

Procedures for Recognized Student Groups

Open Flame Policy

Room Reservations and Special Events Policy and Procedures

Rules of Public Order

Sexual Harassment Policy

Sign and Poster Regulations

Smokefree Workplace Regulations

Student Academic Dishonesty Policy and Procedures

Student Records Policy

 Secure Animals on Campus Policy

Security Camera Policy

Sexual Misconduct Policy

Sex Offense Information

Traffic Control and Parking Guidelines

Use of College Facilities by Students and Student Organizations

Village of Geneseo Policies

Violent Felony Offenses and Missing Students

Visitation Privileges

Visitor Policy

Weapons Policy 

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Campus Administrative Rules for Students


In order to be eligible for admission and readmission, and to be considered a student in good standing, each student must do the following:

  • Provide the College, through the Office of the Registrar, with current local and home addresses and telephone numbers, and respond promptly to all official requests for information or appointments.
  • Check their Geneseo email account and College mailbox in the MacVittie College Union on a regular basis as official College communication may take place via these addresses.
  • Obtain a College identification card that is to be presented upon request to any member of the faculty or staff.
  • Notify the Registrar of name changes and change in other contact information in a timely fashion.
  • Comply with official requests of College faculty and staff members, including authorized student employees; obey regulations governing the use of campus facilities, including residence halls, and assure that guests do the same.
  • Pay on time all fees, penalties, and other debts owed to the College; and return library materials or other borrowed College property when due and upon request.
  • Be present on campus when necessary (e.g., required meetings, registration, examinations) to show an unconditional intention of doing academic work and pursuing a degree; and notify the secretary to the Dean of Students of any planned absence during class sessions which is to last more than one week, in order to make clear that permanent withdrawal is not intended.
  • Maintain the level of physical and emotional health necessary for the completion of academic work and for living in the college community that does not, in the judgment of appropriate clinical and administrative officials, present a pronounced risk to the student's own health or the welfare of others.
  • Complete the formal withdrawal procedure upon leaving the College, unless dismissed, graduated, or granted a waiver due to inability to be present on campus.
  • Register any car driven regularly on campus and obey all vehicle regulations.


Supervisors of various campus facilities (e.g., dining hall, gymnasium, game room) are authorized to suspend usage privileges of students who violate rules or direct instructions from College officials. Each loss of privilege is reported to the Dean of Students, to whom it may be appealed, and the supervisor is expected to offer an interview regarding reasons at the time a restriction is applied.

A student may act as an official representative of the College or University only with authority from the President or a Vice President. College endorsements of private endeavors may not be implied.

No student may represent a commercial enterprise, advertise or conduct business, or attempt profitable fund-raising or sales of any type on campus except as part of an approved student organization activity. (Exception: Students may charge for typing, tutoring, and similar educational services rendered solely by themselves as individuals.) Student organizations may not sell, advertise, or raise funds in any way on or off campus without written permission from the Director of College Union and Activities or designee. Nonprofit political and charitable fund-raising must be similarly approved.

Administrative separation from the College may occur, for example, for violating any of the above regulations. Procedure for an administrative separation includes the opportunity for a hearing before the Dean of Students and an appeal to the Vice President for Student and Campus Life. Short of release, failure to meet financial or administrative obligations to the College may result in withholding an academic transcript and the credits recorded thereon, or withholding the privilege of registration for a subsequent term, or both. Students released for administrative reasons will be recommended for readmission at the discretion of the Dean of Students, pending completion of stipulated requirements detailed in the student's administrative release letter.

SUNY Geneseo Policy on Alcohol and Illicit Drugs

The College is committed to providing an environment that is supportive of the academic mission of the institution.  Students are considered adults who are responsible for conducting themselves in accordance with state and local law and with the College’s policy on alcohol and illicit drugs.  The College respects students’ privacy and autonomy and assumes that their behavior will be both legal and responsible.

Students are expected to accept responsibility for the welfare of themselves and to avoid infringing upon the rights of other members of the College community.  When violations of law or policy come to the attention of College officials, appropriate sanctions will be imposed and repeat violations will be dealt with severely.  A fundamental kind of misconduct that may lead to conduct action is the illegal use, sale, or possession of stimulants, intoxicants, or other illicit drugs, and/or the participation of a student or campus visitor in an incident, accident or personal injury that is related to the use by that student or visitor of any stimulant, intoxicant, or other illicit drug.

Loss of privileges, specified conduct requirements, or separation from the College may be imposed on any student or visitor whose conduct adversely affects the academic community.  The behavior of a visitor may result in sanctions placed on both the visitor and student host.  Policy violations will be addressed through the College’s conduct system and/or University Police.

Regulations Specific to Alcohol

Possession and Consumption of Alcoholic Beverages for Persons under Age 21

Alcoholic beverages may not be provided to anyone under 21 years of age in accordance with New York State Law. 

1. Possession and consumption of alcoholic beverages by persons under the age of 21 is prohibited on the Geneseo Campus.

Possession and Consumption of Alcoholic Beverages for Persons 21 Years of Age and Over

Persons 21 years of age and over may possess alcoholic beverages in their own residence hall rooms or in the rooms of other residents who are at least 21 years of age.

1.  Persons 21 years of age and over may possess/consume alcoholic beverages only in their own residence hall rooms, in the rooms of other residents who are at least 21 years of age, or at events where alcohol is serviced/catered by CAS (Campus Auxiliary Services, Inc.), in accordance with New York State Law and College Policy.

2.  In the residence halls, alcoholic beverages are prohibited in main lounges, recreation rooms, floor lounges, hall corridors, laundry rooms, and any other area that is not a private student room.

3.  Since alcoholic beverages are approved only for private, individual consumption by those 21 years of age and over, beer balls, kegs, or other large quantity containers are prohibited on campus (unless at an event where alcohol is serviced/catered by CAS).  University Police may confiscate the foregoing items (empty or full) and accessories (e.g., taps--if they are being used) for disposal, return, and/or removal off-campus.  As a health and safety consideration, the Vice President for Student and Campus Life reserves the right to ban beer bottles from campus.

4.  The College does not sponsor nor approve any residence hall function where alcohol is served or consumed.

5.  As a health and safety consideration, returnable cans or bottles should be redeemed immediately and should not be stored in a residence hall room, a closet, or under a bed, etc.  If conditions warrant, residents will be required to remove offensive materials.

6.  Organizations are discouraged from planning events that have as their primary focus the serving/sale of alcoholic beverages.

7.  Drinking games or contests that involve alcohol consumption are prohibited.

8.  Advertising on campus of events or activities which promote use of alcoholic beverages and/or illicit drugs is prohibited.

9.  The possession and/or consumption of alcoholic beverages by participants in or spectators at any intercollegiate, intramural, or club sport event is expressly prohibited.

Student Conduct

1.  Each student is responsible for his/her own conduct and the conduct of his/her invited visitor(s).  Individuals and groups may be held liable in campus conduct action in addition to civil and/or criminal proceedings for incidents related to the service/use of alcohol.

2.  Improper conduct in violation of the “Student Code of Conduct” will be addressed by the College staff.

3.  The claim of being under the influence of alcoholic beverages or other illicit drugs will not be accepted as an excuse for misconduct.  Any misconduct, as defined by the “Student Code of Conduct,” involving alcoholic beverages will be referred to the appropriate office for review and action.

Summary of New York State Laws Governing Alcohol

Under New York State Law it is illegal:

1.   to sell alcohol, including charging admission (or accepting donations) at the door of an event where alcohol is distributed free of charge, without an alcohol control license.  Further, you cannot sell, deliver, give away or cause or permit or procure to be sold, delivered or given away any alcoholic beverages to any person, actually or apparently under the age of 21 years of age (parents or guardians may serve alcohol to their children in the privacy of their own home) or to any visibly intoxicated person (ABC Law Sec. 65, Penal Law 260.20 (2));

2.   for any person to misrepresent the age of a person under the age of 21 for the purpose of inducing the sale of any alcoholic beverage to such person.  That is, a person over 21 cannot buy/procure alcohol for a person under 21. A person convicted of first offense shall be punished by a fine of not more than $200.00, or by imprisonment for not more than 5 days, or by both fine and imprisonment (ABC Law Sec. 65a);

3.   for a person under the age of 21 to misrepresent his or her age, or to use false identification for the purpose of buying or otherwise obtaining alcohol.  Persons under the age of 21 who present falsified or fraudulently altered proof of age for the purpose of purchasing or attempting to purchase alcoholic beverages are guilty of a violation, punishable by a fine of up to $100.00 and/or a community service requirement of up to 30 hours (first violation); punishable by a fine of not less than $50.00 nor more than three hundred fifty dollars and/or an appropriate amount of community service not to exceed thirty hours, and the completion of an alcohol awareness program (second violation); punishable by a fine of not less than fifty dollars nor more than seven hundred fifty dollars and/or an appropriate amount of community service not to exceed thirty hours, and an evaluation by an appropriate agency certified or licensed by the office of alcoholism and substance abuse services (third or more violations).  The Alcoholic Beverage Control Law now requires sellers of alcoholic beverages to demand a driver’s license, passport, or armed services ID card, rather than any other form of identification, as evidence of age.  Alteration of one of the required forms of official ID may constitute “possession of a forged instrument...with intent to defraud,” which is a class D felony under New York State penal law.  If a New York State driver’s license is altered, the court may suspend the person’s license to drive a motor vehicle for three months (first violation); for six months (second violation); for one year or until the holder reaches the age of twenty-one, whichever is the greater period of time (third or more violations).  Following the suspension the person may then apply for and be issued a restricted license (ABC Law Sec. 65b);

4.  for an underage person to possess any alcoholic beverage with the intent to consume.  (Exceptions are provided for consumption in an instructional setting and in cases where the alcoholic beverage is provided by a parent or guardian.)  Violators are subject to a fine of up to $50.00 per offense and/or completion of an alcohol awareness program, but are not subject to arrest (ABC Law Sec. 65c).

Under New York State civil law, a provider of alcohol to a person who becomes intoxicated and subsequently causes harm to another person(s) (in person, property, means of support or otherwise) may be liable for any damages or injuries caused by the intoxicated person.  Any person, who is injured (in person, property, means of support or otherwise) by reason of the intoxication of any person under 21, may sue for damages against any person who knowingly caused such intoxication by unlawfully furnishing or procuring alcoholic beverages for such person with knowledge or cause to believe that such person was under the age of 21.  Further, the law provides a right of recovery for injuries caused by the illegal sale of intoxicating liquor to any intoxicated person.  (General Obligations Law, Section 11-100 & 11-101)

Summary of Village of Geneseo Codes Governing Alcohol

1. Carrying of open containers prohibited.

     No person shall carry, transport or have in his possession with the intent to consume in any public place, other than permitted public places, any open, resealed or partly empty bottle, can, container or similar article containing an alcoholic beverage of any kind or description as defined by the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law.

2. Deposit of containers prohibited.

     No person shall break, leave, discard or deposit in any manner any glass, bottle, glassware, crockery, can or container of any kind, make or description in any public place other than in receptacles expressly for that purpose.

3. Penalties for offenses.

     Any person who violates any provision of this chapter shall be guilty of an offense, as defined in the Penal Law of the State of New York, and shall, upon conviction thereof, be subject to a fine not to exceed two hundred fifty dollars ($250.) or to imprisonment for a term not to exceed fifteen (15) days, or both.

(The State and Village information summarized here is not complete.  See the New York State Alcoholic Beverage Control Law (specifically ABC Law Sec. 65, 65a, 65b, 65c, 65d), Penal Law 260.20(2), General Obligations Law, Section 11-100 & 11-101, and Chapter 33 of the Geneseo (Village) Laws for additional information.).

Bias Crimes and the Law

It is a State University of New York - College at Geneseo Police mandate to protect all members of the Geneseo community by preventing and prosecuting bias or hate crimes that occur within the campus's jurisdiction.

Bias crimes, also called hate crimes or bias-related crimes, are criminal activities motivated by the perpetrator's bias or attitude against an individual victim or group based on perceived or actual personal characteristics, such as race, religion, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, or disability. Bias/hate crimes have received renewed attention in recent years, particularly since the passage of the federal Hate/Bias Crime Reporting Act of 1990 and the New York State Hate Crimes Act of 2000 (Penal Law Article 485). For a copy of the New York law, see Appendix H.

Penalties for bias crimes are very serious and range from fines to imprisonment for lengthy periods, depending on the nature of the underlying criminal offense, the use of violence or previous convictions of the offender. Perpetrators who are students will also be subject to campus conduct procedures where sanctions including dismissal are possible.

In addition to preventing and prosecuting bias/hate crimes, SUNY Geneseo Police also address bias-related activities that do not rise to the level of a crime. These activities, referred to as bias incidents and defined by the College as acts of bigotry, harassment, or intimidation directed at a member or group within the Geneseo community based on national origin, ethnicity, race, age, religion, gender, sexual orientation, disability, veteran status, color, creed, or marital status, may be addressed through the State University's Discrimination Complaint Procedure or the Geneseo Student Code of Conduct. Bias incidents can be reported to University Police, the Dean of Students, or the Affirmative Action office.  (Procedures for students to report bias-related incidents)

If you are a victim of, or witness to, a bias/hate crime on campus, report it to University Police by calling 245-5222 in an emergency, using a Blue Light or other campus emergency telephone, calling 245-5651, or stopping by University Police at 19 Schrader Hall. University Police will investigate and follow the appropriate adjudication procedures.

Victims of bias crime or bias incidents can avail themselves of counseling and support services from the campus as follows:

  • Counseling Services at the Lauderdale Health Center provides crisis intervention, supportive psychotherapy and/or referral for victims of hate/bias crime. Contacts with Counseling Services are strictly confidential. Support is provided in an atmosphere of acceptance, respect and empathetic understanding which focuses on victims' empowerment. Concerned friends, family and/or partners of students who are victims are also welcome to contact the Counseling office for assistance in responding to the crime. Appointments may be made by visiting the Lauderdale Center or by telephoning 245-5716.
  • The Dean of Students (354 MacVittie Union, telephone 245-5706) maintains links with community services which assist victims of bias/hate crime. A visit or call to the Dean's Office will assist in identifying and securing assistance from an outside agency.
  • The Coordinator of Multicultural Programs and Services (353 MacVittie Union, telephone 245-5620) provides information on how and where to file a report of bias/hate crime and can act as a support for victims through the process. Emphasis is placed on empowering the victim to make decisions that are appropriate for her/him.
  • University Police in Schrader 19 is available 24 hours per day to assist in emergency situations. (Emergency telephone number is 5222 or any Campus "Blue Light Telephone" provides a direct emergency connection.) University Police will respond to the scene of an emergency situation, process complaints regarding any violation of state, federal, or local law and coordinate outside law enforcement, if necessary.


A copy of the State University of New York - College at Geneseo campus crime statistics, including bias-related and bias crimes, as reported annually to the U.S. Department of Education, will be provided upon request by University Police. Please direct all such requests, as well as general requests about security procedures, to University Police at (585) 245-5651. Information can also be obtained in Crime and Campus Safety - Your Right-To-Knowpublication, the University Police website at: http://www.geneseo.edu/police/, or the U.S. Department of Education website at: http://ope.ed.gov/security/.

Credit Card Policy

SUNY Geneseo realizes the importance of fundraising to its clubs, organizations, and departments. The following policy has been established as an addendum to the already existing SUNY Geneseo fundraising policy, to ensure that various fundraising efforts are in accordance with Federal and State laws.

For the purposes of these guidelines, "credit card vendors" is defined as anyone soliciting student applications for credit cards including, but not limited to, individual students, student groups, not-for-profit groups, and commercial organizations.

Pursuant to Article 129-A of the New York State Education Law 6437 (Prohibition on the marketing of credit cards) the advertising, marketing, or merchandising of credit cards to students by vendors is prohibited at the State University of New York at Geneseo, except those published in newspapers, magazines, or similar publications, or except within the following guidelines:

1. The SUNY Geneseo Credit Union may provide credit card applications as part of the array of services offered to individuals opening an account.
2. Local banks represented at the Information Fair at New Student Orientation may provide credit card applications as part of the array of services offered to individuals opening an account.
3. The Credit Union and banks are prohibited from offering gifts or prizes to students in exchange for credit card information, handouts, or applications.
4. Credit card policies must be clearly displayed by the Credit Union or banks at the solicitation site and copies of the credit card policies must be distributed to all individuals who accept (or complete) an application (these policies must pertain to, but are not limited to interest rates, teaser rates, and annual fees).
5. The Credit Union and banks must distribute, and clearly post at the solicitation site, information on the dangers and consequences of consumer debt to all individuals who take (or complete) a credit card application.

External agencies to the institution, other than banks and the Credit Union, may not solicit credit cards to current students. This provision includes the campus bookstore, which may not include credit card material in books or bags.

Information about good credit management practices, including the prevention of personal debt and identity theft, can be obtained through credit-bearing classes, GOLD workshops, Orientation, the Student Organization Expo, or electronic links to off-campus agencies.

Students should be ever vigilant about unsolicited telemarketing solicitations, especially those for credit cards and those that ask for personal information. No door-to-door solicitation of any kind is allowed in the residence halls, but as a campus we cannot prevent phone solicitations. Students are encouraged to contact the National DO NOT CALL registry to prevent unwanted phone solicitations. Preventing these calls is quick and easy. Students simply log into http://www.donotcall.gov; click register now, and enter their phone number. Additional directions will then be emailed. The Do Not Call request lasts for five years.

This policy does not apply to direct mailings to non-student constituencies by the College, its departments, or alumni association.

Drug-Free Schools Information

The State University of New York College at Geneseo certifies it is in compliance with Public Law 101-226, The Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act of 1989.  To this end, the College has adopted and implemented a program to prevent the illicit use of drugs and the abuse of alcohol by students and employees.

As mandated by section 22 of Public Law 101-226, the College will distribute annually to its students and employees, the following information:

  • standards of conduct that clearly prohibit, at a minimum, the unlawful possession, use or distribution of drugs and alcohol by students and employees on College property or as any part of Geneseo's activities;
  • a description of the applicable legal sanctions under local, New York State, and Federal law for unlawful possession, use or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol;
  • a description of the health risks associated with the use of illicit drugs and the abuse of alcohol;
  • a description of any drug and alcohol counseling, treatment, or rehabilitation programs that are available to students and employees; and
  • a clear statement that Geneseo will impose sanctions on students and employees (consistent with local, New York State, and Federal law, and collective bargaining agreements) and a description of these sanctions, up to and including expulsion or termination of employment and referral for prosecution for violations of the standards of conduct. A disciplinary sanction may include the completion of an appropriate rehabilitation program.

In addition, the College will conduct a biennial review of its program to:

(a) determine its effectiveness and

(b) ensure that the sanctions developed by the College are consistently enforced.

I. Student Conduct

The rights and privileges exercised by any person are always a function of relationships with others.  The College at Geneseo condemns the unlawful use, possession, or distribution of alcoholic beverages and/or drugs on College property or as any part of College sponsored activities.  To this end, the College will enforce the Student Code of Conduct and take appropriate conduct action when violations occur.  In addition, criminal action will be taken when appropriate.

Loss of privilege, specified conduct requirements, or separation from the College may be imposed on any student whose conduct on or off campus adversely affects the academic community, particularly as it shows failure to accept responsibility for the welfare of one's self and other persons.  Fundamental kinds of misconduct involving alcohol and other drugs which may lead to conduct action, including suspension or dismissal from the College, are as follows:

  • Illegal use, sale, distribution, manufacturing, or possession of alcohol, intoxicants, or drugs (including but not limited to controlled substances and prescription medication). Participation of a student in any incident, accident, or personal injury that is related to the use by that student of any alcohol, intoxicant, or drug. (SUNY Geneseo Student Code of Conduct-No. 8).
  • Use or possession of open containers of alcoholic beverages on campus other than at approved locations and events, or in accordance with the SUNY Geneseo Policy on Alcohol and Illicit Drugs is prohibited. Containers of alcoholic beverages found on campus which are not in compliance with approved college policies will be confiscated and/or destroyed by a University Police Officer. (SUNY Geneseo Student Code of Conduct-No. 9.).

 II. Employee Conduct

Compliance with the provisions of the College's drug and alcohol policies is a condition of employment subject to criminal charges and/or disciplinary action under the various negotiated agreements, including satisfactory completion of an approved drug or alcohol rehabilitation program.

Student employees are subject to discipline up to and including termination of employment and referral for discipline in accordance with the Student Code of Conduct, or corrective action as the College deems appropriate, including satisfactory completion of an approved drug or alcohol rehabilitation program.

 III. Local, State and Federal Laws

A.  Local Laws  (see Appendix C)

 B.  State Laws  (see Appendix D)

 C.  Federal Laws  (see Appendix E)

 IV.  Health Risks

If you are like many Americans, you may drink alcohol occasionally.  Or, like others, you may drink moderate amounts of alcohol on a more regular basis.  If you are a woman or someone over the age of 65, this means you have no more than one drink per day; if you are a man, this means you have no more than two drinks per day.  Drinking at these levels usually is not associated with health risks and may help prevent certain forms of heart disease.

But did you know that even moderate drinking, under certain circumstances, can be risky?  If you drink at more than moderate levels, you may be putting yourself at risk for serious problems with your health as well as problems with family, friends, and coworkers.

What Is a Drink?

A standard drink is:

  • One 12-ounce bottle of beer* or wine cooler or
    One 5-ounce glass of wine or
    1.5 ounces of 80-proof distilled spirits.

*Different beers have different alcohol content.  Malt liquor has a higher alcohol content than most other brewed beverages.

Drinking and Driving

It may surprise you to learn that you don't need to drink much alcohol before your driving ability is affected.  For example, certain driving skills can be impaired by blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) as low as 0.02 percent.  (The BAC refers to the amount of alcohol in the blood.)  A 160-pound man will have a BAC of about 0.04 percent 1 hour after drinking two 12-ounce beers or two other standard drinks on an empty stomach (see "What Is a Drink?").  And the more alcohol you drink, the more impaired your driving skills will be.  Although most States set the BAC limit for adults who drive after drinking at 0.08 percent, driving skills are affected at much lower levels.

Interactions With Medications

Drinking alcohol while taking certain medications can cause problems.  In fact, there are more than 150 medications that should not be mixed with alcohol.  For example, if you are taking antihistamines for a cold or allergy and drink alcohol, the alcohol will increase the drowsiness that the medicine alone can cause, making driving or operating machinery even more dangerous.  And if you are taking large doses of the painkiller acetaminophen (Tylenol®) and drinking alcohol, you are risking serious liver damage.  (See Appendix F:  "Drugs and Alcohol Don't Mix")  Check with your doctor or pharmacist before drinking any amount of alcohol if you are taking any over-the-counter or prescription medicines.

Social and Legal Problems

The more heavily you drink, the greater the potential for problems at home, at work, with friends, and even with strangers.  These problems may include:

  • Arguments with or separation from your spouse and other family members;
  • Strained relationships with coworkers;
  • Absence from or lateness to work with increasing frequency;
  • Loss of employment due to decreased productivity; and
  • Committing or being the victim of violence.

Alcohol-Related Birth Defects

If you are pregnant or trying to get pregnant, you should not drink alcohol.  Drinking alcohol while you are pregnant can cause a range of birth defects, and children exposed to alcohol before birth can have lifelong learning and behavioral problems.  The most serious problem that can be caused by drinking during pregnancy is fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS).  Children born with FAS have severe physical, mental, and behavioral problems.  Because scientists do not know exactly how much alcohol it takes to cause alcohol-related birth defects, it is best not to drink any alcohol during this time.

Long-Term Health Problems

Some problems, like those mentioned above, can occur after drinking over a relatively short period of time.  But other problems - such as liver disease, heart disease, certain forms of cancer, and pancreatitis - often develop more gradually and may become evident only after many years of heavy drinking.  Women may develop alcohol-related health problems sooner than men, and from drinking less alcohol than men.  Because alcohol affects nearly every organ in the body, long-term heavy drinking increases the risk for many serious health problems.

Snapshot of Annual High-Risk College Drinking Consequences

  • Death: 1,400 college students between the ages of 18 and 24 die each year from alcohol-related unintentional injuries, including motor vehicle crashes (Hingson et al., 2002).
  • Injury: 500,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are unintentionally injured under the influence of alcohol (Hingson et al., 2002).
  • Assault: More than 600,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are assaulted by another student who has been drinking (Hingson et al., 2002).
  • Sexual Abuse: More than 70,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are victims of alcohol-related sexual assault or date rape (Hingson et al., 2002).
  • Unsafe Sex: 400,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 had unprotected sex and more than 100,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 report having been too intoxicated to know if they consented to having sex (Hingson et al., 2002).
  • Academic Problems: About 25 percent of college students report academic consequences of their drinking including missing class, falling behind, doing poorly on exams or papers, and receiving lower grades overall (Engs et al., 1996; Presley et al., 1996a, 1996b; Wechsler et al., 2002).
  • Health Problems/Suicide Attempts: More than 150,000 students develop an alcohol-related health problem (Hingson et al., 2002) and between 1.2 and 1.5 percent of students indicate that they tried to commit suicide within the past year due to drinking or drug use (Presley et al., 1998).
  • Drunk Driving: 2.1 million students between the ages of 18 and 24 drove under the influence of alcohol last year (Hingson et al., 2002).
  • Vandalism: About 11 percent of college student drinkers report that they have damaged property while under the influence of alcohol (Wechsler et al., 2002).
  • Property Damage: More than 25 percent of administrators from schools with relatively low drinking levels and over 50 percent from schools with high drinking levels say their campuses have a "moderate" or "major" problem with alcohol-related property damage (Wechsler et al., 1995).
  • Police Involvement: About 5 percent of 4-year college students are involved with the police or campus security as a result of their drinking (Wechsler et al., 2002) and an estimated 110,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are arrested for an alcohol-related violation such as public drunkenness or driving under the influence (Hingson et al., 2002).
  • Alcohol Abuse and Dependence: 31 percent of college students met criteria for a diagnosis of alcohol abuse and 6 percent for a diagnosis of alcohol dependence in the past 12 months, according to questionnaire-based self-reports about their drinking (Knight et al., 2002).

(National Institute on Alcohol Abuse & Alcoholism -NIAAA)

Warning Signs (see also Appendix G)

The following are some warning signs which may indicate a problem with alcohol and/or other drugs:

  • getting drunk or high on drugs on a regular basis
  • lying about how much alcohol or other drugs he or she is using
  • avoiding others in order to get drunk or high
  • giving up activities he or she used to do, such as sports, homework just to use drugs or drink
  • planning drinking or using drugs in advance, hiding alcohol and drugs, drinking or using other drugs alone
  • having to drink more or use higher amounts of drugs to get the same high
  • believing that in order to have fun you need to drink or use other drugs
  • frequent hangovers
  • pressuring others to drink or use other drugs
  • taking risks, including sexual risks or drinking and driving
  • having "blackouts" or memory lapses
  • feeling run-down and sick, hopeless, depressed, or even suicidal
  • sounding selfish and not caring about others
  • constantly talking about drinking or using other drugs
  • getting in trouble with the law and or campus authorities
  • suspension from school for an alcohol or other drug-related incident

The time element also varies, and some drugs remain in the system for as long as several days.

 V.  Services

Health and Counseling offers a wide range of services for students who are concerned about alcohol and other drugs.  These services include:

  • Alcohol Evaluations - Students may be seen by a psychologist for an evaluation of their alcohol/drug use and related problems.  Evaluations include recommendations for further assessment, treatment, and education as indicated. Students can schedule an alcohol evaluation by calling Counseling Services at 245-5716.
  • Alcohol/Drug Counseling - Students may voluntarily participate in individual or group counseling to address issues related to their use of alcohol and other drugs.  Students in need of substance abuse rehabilitation services are referred for treatment off-campus.  Counseling Services does not provide mandated (including court-referred) treatment.  Students can schedule a counseling appointment by calling Counseling Services at 245-5716.
  • Alcohol Screening - Students can complete an anonymous, on-line screening of their alcohol use by visiting the Health and Counseling website at https://www.mentalhealthscreening.org/screening/wel-come.asp.  Students who complete the screening will receive recommendations based on their individual responses.

In addition, Health Services (245-5736) provides urgent and non-urgent care to students who have difficulties with alcohol and other drugs.  Health and Counseling staff also have information about area treatment and support resources, including chapters of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and Narcotics Anonymous (NA).  Health and Counseling is located in the Lauderdale Health Center on University Drive.

 VI.  Biennial Review Committee

A Review Committee will be convened every two years to determine the effectiveness of the College's Drug Free Schools Act compliance program and to recommend any changes, if necessary.  In addition, the committee will review pertinent disciplinary actions and ensure that sanctions are enforced consistently.

The committee will be composed of:

  • Associate Provost
  • Dean of Students (Chair)
  • Director of Health and Counseling
  • Asst. Vice President for Human Resources
  • Chief of University Police

Hazing Policy

Hazing means any act, explicit or implicit, committed by a person, whether individually or in concert with others, against a student in connection with pledging, being initiated into, affiliating with, holding office in, or maintaining membership in any organization or team and which is intended to have the effect of, or should reasonably be expected to have the effect of, humiliating, intimidating or demeaning the student or endangering the mental or physical health of the student, regardless of the person's willingness to participate.  Hazing also includes soliciting, directing, aiding, or otherwise participating actively or passively in the above acts.

(Approved by College Council Feb. 17, 2012)


Geneseo's Student Code of Conduct states that all members of the college community are required to abide by the statutory Rules of Public Order (Section 6450) of the New York State Education Law which specifically states:

No person, either singly or in concert with others shall...

Take any action, create or participate in the creation of any situation which recklessly or intentionally endangers mental or physical health or which involves the forced consumption of liquor or drugs for the purpose of initiation into or affiliation with any organization.

New York State Penal Law - HAZING

Section l20.l6 Hazing in the first degree.

A person is guilty of hazing in the first degree when, in the course of another person's initiation into or affiliation with any organization, he intentionally or recklessly engages in conduct which creates a substantial risk of physical injury to such other person or a third person and thereby causes such injury.

Hazing in the first degree is a class A misdemeanor.

Section l20.l7 Hazing in the second degree.

A person is guilty of hazing in the second degree when, in the course of another person's initiation or affiliation with any organization, he intentionally or recklessly engages in conduct which creates a substantial risk of physical injury to such other person or a third person.

Hazing in the second degree is a violation.

Violations of the College's hazing policy, the Rules of Public Order, or state law will not be tolerated. Individuals and recognized organizations who violate any of the above policies, rules, regulations or laws are subject to college conduct, as well as legal, action; organizations are subject to college disciplinary action, and risk losing such things as college privileges and/or recognition.

Immunization Policy

New York State Public Health Law requires students taking six or more credits to provide proof of immunity to Measles, Mumps, and Rubella.  Also, ALL students must have been immunized or must verify by their signature that they have received information about meningococcal disease and have made an informed decision about whether or not to receive immunization against meningococcal disease.

SUNY Geneseo requires that all students return their completed Personal and Medical History form, demonstrating compliance with the immunization and meningitis response requirements, by the following deadlines. 

•   For students entering in the fall:  June 1st 

•   For students entering in the spring:  December 1st

•   For students accepted late:  within four weeks of acceptance.

 Note:  Students born before 1957 are exempt from the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine portion of the NYS requirement.

Upon receipt of the Personal and Medical History form, Health Services will review to make sure all requirements are met.  It will take three to five working days for data to be processed after it has been received.  Students who are not in compliance will be notified.

•   If students have not achieved full compliance with all requirements by July 18, a records and registration HOLD will be placed on their account.

•   If students are not in compliance by the 30th day of the semester, they will be DISENROLLED from the College. 

•   Out of state resident students and international students have 45 days to comply.  If they do not comply by the 45th day of the semester, they will be DISENROLLED from the College.

It is the responsibility of the Administrative Director of Student Health and Counseling to enforce these requirements.

Proof of Immunization

•     For proof of immunization, only an official record (such as a school immunization record) or a statement signed by a health-care provider can be accepted. 

•    Combination vaccine (MMR): two doses of live vaccine must be administered on or after the first birthday (4 weeks minimum between first and second doses) – or -  Individual vaccinations:

•   Measles: two doses of live vaccine administered on or after the first birthday; or protective-antibody titer result; or physician-diagnosed history of disease.

•   Mumps: two doses of live vaccine administered on or after the first birthday; or protective-antibody titer result; or physician-diagnosed history of disease.

•   Rubella: one dose of live vaccine; or protective-antibody titer result (NOTE: previous clinical diagnosis of Rubella is not acceptable proof).

 

Information Regarding Sex Offenses

In recent years there has been concern at both the national and state levels regarding the incidence of sex offenses on college campuses. In an effort to educate our College community, we are providing the following information to all students.

It is best to keep in mind that any college is not a "safe haven" where personal safety issues can be ignored. All students, staff and visitors must take reasonable precautions and use sound judgment regarding their behavior. Unfortunately, college campuses are not immune from crime.

Sex offenses occur on and off college campuses. While some victims are assaulted by assailants who are unknown, more frequently the campus victim is assaulted by a person known to the victim. These incidents are described as "acquaintance rapes." The assailant may be a date or a girl/boyfriend of the victim. However, s/he may also be someone who is identifiable because s/he is in a class with the victim, a resident of the same residence hall as the victim, or a friend of a friend of the victim. Irresponsible use of alcohol and/or use of other mind-altering substances are frequently involved in these situations. Sound, unimpaired judgment and concern for personal safety of self and others help prevent such victimizations. (See State Penal Law Pertaining to Sex Offenses - Appendix B.)

I. College Regulations Regarding Sex Offenses
Geneseo students who are victims of sexual offenses [e.g., rape, sexual abuse, nonconsensual sexual activity; (see previous section)] which occurred either on the Geneseo campus or at a location off-campus are encouraged to report their experiences to a College official. If a student is a victim of such an offense, s/he should report the incident as soon as possible to a College official in one of the following areas:

Office of Dean of Students MacVittie Union 245-5706
Office of University Police* Schrader 245-5651
Health Services Lauderdale 245-5736
*open 24 hours

If immediate emergency assistance is required, on-campus residents should contact University Police at 245-5222 or utilize one of the blue light emergency telephones on campus. If the victim lives off-campus and the assault occurred off-campus, the 911 system should be utilized first. An off-campus student should file a subsequent report with College officials (listed above) if the offense was perpetrated by a Geneseo student.

In a situation where there is the potential for a criminal complaint, it is extremely important that the victim does not disturb any physical evidence. Therefore, the victim should not change clothing, bathe, shower, douche, or wash before seeking assistance. It is important for the victim to understand that College personnel in the above mentioned areas have been trained to work with victims and to follow appropriate protocols for victims of sexual assault.

The College prohibits sexual assault through the "Student Code of Conduct," which may be found in this publication, the on-line Student Handbook or the Geneseo Undergraduate Bulletin.

Student victims have the option of filing a complaint within the College Conduct system, a criminal complaint with the office of University Police or local law enforcement agency, or both. College personnel will assist students in initiating such complaints to outside agencies.

When a complaint regarding a sex offense is made to a College staff member, the College follows its Conduct Procedures at a level appropriate to the reported offense. In addition, if the victim wishes to make a criminal complaint, the Office of University Police will proceed as appropriate for each incident.

Employee policies and procedures regarding sexual harassment are found in Section 150 of the Geneseo Policies and Procedures Manual.

II. Support for Victims of Sex Offenses
Counseling and support services are provided to victims of sex offenses through several Campus offices:

  • Counseling Services, in Lauderdale 205, provides crisis intervention, supportive psychotherapy and/or referral for survivors of rape, attempted rape, sexual assault and child sexual abuse. Contacts with Counseling Services are strictly confidential. Support is provided in an atmosphere of acceptance, respect and empathetic understanding which focuses on survivors' empowerment. Concerned friends, family and/or partners of students who are survivors of sexual victimization are also welcome to contact this office for assistance in responding to the survivor. Appointments may be made by visiting Counseling Services or by telephoning 245-5716.
  • Health Services provides medical care and support to victims of sex offenses. While Health Services does not conduct evidence collection ("rape kits"), the staff can provide immediate medical attention, help students explore their options, and facilitate getting those students who wish to undergo evidence collection to a nearby hospital. Either walk-in visits or scheduled appointments (245-5736) are available.
  • The Dean of Students Office (354 MacVittie Union, telephone 245-5706) maintains links with community services which assist victims of sex offenses. A visit or call to the dean's office will assist in identifying and securing assistance from an outside agency.
  • The Office of University Police in Schrader 19 is available 24 hours per day to assist in emergency situations. (Emergency telephone number 5222 or any Campus "blue light telephone" provides a direct emergency connection.) University Police will respond to the scene of an emergency situation, process complaints regarding any violation of state, federal, or local law and coordinate outside law enforcement and/or medical assistance, if necessary.
  • The offices of the Title IX Coordinator or Deputy Coordinator

Several off-campus resources are also available:

  • Livingston County Rape Crisis Center offers a free and confidential 24-hour hotline which is staffed by trained advocates who provide short-term counseling, offer referrals, and are available to accompany victims to the hospital, the police station, and any conduct hearings.
  • Hot Line: 1-800-527-1757
  • Livingston County Sheriff
    • 585-243-7100
    • 911 (Emergency)
  • Geneseo Village Police
    • 585-243-2420

III. Education
The College educates students regarding security procedures through residence hall programs, signage, safety campaigns, College publications, and special college-wide programming via College cable TV. Each semester, programs regarding such topics as personal safety, rape prevention, alcohol and other substances, and prevention of burglary and theft are presented. Specific program information may be obtained through the Dean of Students Office (585-245-5706) in MacVittie College Union 354.

The Coordinator of Health Promotion, located in the Lauderdale Center, is available to offer programs concerning sexual violence awareness, along with a range of other issues. HealthGuards is a student group of peer health educators who are trained to present health-related programs to residents, student groups, and faculty and staff.

If someone you know has been a victim of a sexual offense:

  • Make sure they are safe;
  • Believe them;
  • Reinforce that no matter what the circumstances, the offense was not their fault;

Refer them to:

  • Health Services (585-245-5736)
  • Counseling Services (585-245-5716)
  • Their Resident Director
  • University Police (585-245-5651; 585-245-5222)
  • Dean of Students (585-245-5706)
  • Rape Crisis Center (1-800-527-1757)
  • The Title IX webpage for students

If they live off campus:

  • Livingston County Sheriff (585-243-7100; 911)
  • Geneseo Village Police (585-243-2420; 911)

Allow them to make their own decisions concerning medical attention and pressing charges. Encourage them to preserve evidence.

IV. Advisory Committee on Campus Security
The president or chief administrative officer of the College appoints an advisory committee on campus security. This committee is part of the larger campus Personal Safety Committee.

The advisory committee shall consist of a minimum of six members, at least half of whom shall be female; one-third of the committee shall be appointed from a list of students that contains at least twice the number to be appointed which is provided by the largest student governance organization on such campus, one-third thereof shall be appointed from a list of faculty members that contains twice the number to be appointed which is provided by the largest faculty organization on such campus, and one-third of whom shall be selected by the president or chief administrative officer.

The committee shall review current campus security policies and procedures and make recommendations for their improvement. It shall specifically review current policies and procedures for:
a. educating the campus community, including security personnel and those persons who advise or supervise students, about sexual assault pursuant to section sixty-four hundred thirty-two of this article;
b. educating the campus community about personal safety and crime prevention;
c. reporting sexual assaults and dealing with victims during investigations;
d. referring complaints to appropriate authorities;
e. counseling victims; and
f. responding to inquiries from concerned persons.

The committee shall report, in writing, to the college president or chief administrative officer on its findings and recommendations at least once each academic year, and such report shall be available upon request.

Conduct Procedures For Recognized Student Groups

Student organizations are an integral part of the co-curricular life on the Geneseo campus.  Such organizations exist to offer a maximum number of opportunities for students to pursue their educational, social and recreational interests.  Insofar as they are sanctioned, recognized*, and supported by the College, they become an extension of the SUNY Geneseo community.  It is expected that each organization receiving the privileges of recognition will accept the responsibility of representing the College both on and off campus in a positive manner.  Part of that responsibility will include adherence to the Student Code of Conduct.

An established conduct procedure will be used when recognized student organizations, including Club sports and intercollegiate athletic teams of the College, violate the Student Code of Conduct.  This policy does not supersede the administrative prerogative to withdraw recognition for just cause from any campus organization.

The Dean of Students or his/her designee is responsible for the investigation of all complaints or reports charging misconduct by any recognized student group.  If it is determined that there may be cause for action against a recognized student group, the matter will be referred to the Student Conduct Board.  If after investigation the incident appears to result from individual rather than group action, the individual student’s behavior will be subject to review under the Student Conduct Procedure.  Referral of a charge against a group to the Student Conduct Board does not preclude parallel action against the individual students through the College Conduct Procedure in the same case.

Members of the Student Conduct Board Committee are appointed from three of the College’s constituent groups: faculty, administrative staff, and students.  The total membership will consist of at least three appointees from each constituent group.  After appropriate consultation, the Vice President for Student and Campus Life will recommend to the President each year the names of the members.  The President’s appointments to the Committee may be for a specified period of time with there being no limit on the length of time any one individual may serve.

Primary consideration for selection to this Committee is membership in, or advisor to, a recognized organization.

A member of each constituent group will be selected to constitute the Student Conduct Board of three members for each case.  The Dean of Students or designee will serve as non-voting chair of each Board.  The Dean of Students or designee will prove the charges, introduce evidence and other pertinent information for consideration by the Board.  Determination of procedures, introduction of witnesses, rules of evidence, and participation of advisors or attorneys shall be the responsibility of the Dean of Students or designee.

Charges will be presented to a representative of a student organization accused of violation of the Student Code of Conduct no less than three days before the scheduled hearing before the selected Board.  The advisor of record of the organization also will receive a copy of the charges and be invited to attend the hearing.  The charged organization’s representatives will be given the opportunity to meet with the Dean of Students or designee prior to the hearing to discuss the hearing process and procedures.  It will be the responsibility of the charged organization to select no more than two of their members as representatives of the organization at the hearing and any pre-hearing or post-hearing meetings.  These individuals will remain the organizational representatives throughout the appeals process.  The advisor to the organization may attend all sessions and meetings but is not required to do so.

The hearing process is not based on legal standards and allows the Board full access to all pertinent information related to the charges under consideration.  The organization’s representatives are asked to explain and present evidence related to the charges and they are offered an opportunity to discuss with members of the Board all relevant implications of the behavior of their members.  They may bring forward a reasonable number of witnesses to provide testimony on the charges and on behalf of the organization.  In addition, they may directly question any witnesses that have presented testimony or evidence to the Board related to the organization’s misconduct, unless they have agreed in advance that the written statements of the witnesses are correct.  Hearings conducted by the Board are not open to the public.  The current College policy regarding the Right to Legal Counsel will apply to these procedures.

The Board first determines by majority vote of its members whether or not the organization has violated the standards of conduct.  If the majority find the organization has violated the standards of conduct, the Board will, by majority vote, determine the conduct action to be taken against the organization.  The organization’s representatives will be provided the opportunity to provide the Board with information about any extenuating circumstances or other factors that should be considered by the Board prior to the determination of conduct action.

Conduct Actions

The Board’s determination and decision on conduct actions is communicated to the representatives of the organization orally and in writing by the Dean or his/her designee.  A copy of the written decision is kept on file in the Dean of Students’ Office.  The advisor of the organization is provided a copy of the decision and, if the organization has an external affiliation, the headquarters of the organization will be sent a copy of the charges and the decision.  The Board may take any of the following conduct actions:

  • Written Warning - A letter from the Dean of Students or designee reviewing the behavior of the organization that was inappropriate and expectations for the future.  The consequences of similar behavior in the future should be clearly stated.  The date on which the Letter of Warning will be removed from the file should also be included.
  • Probation with Sanctions - A severe warning that will require the organization to take specific actions or refrain from certain activities.  Specifically, an organization may be required to:

1. Perform a specific community service for a specified amount of time or for a specific purpose;

2. Organize and complete a fund-raising activity with the proceeds to be donated to a designated organization;

3. Make restitution of a specified dollar amount to the individual or group injured by the actions of the organization;

4. Be prohibited for a specified period from the use of College facilities or participation in certain Campus activities;

5. In manner to be determined by the Dean of Students, distribute a written public apology to the College and/or local community.

  • Suspension of Recognition - The withdrawal of recognition and its privileges for a specified period of time.  Any conditions required for the rerecognition of the organization should be specified in writing.
  • Withdrawal of Recognition - The permanent withdrawal of recognition and its privileges.

Appeal Process

An organization that has received a conduct sanction under this procedure has the right to appeal the Board’s decision to the Vice President for Student and Campus Life.  The appeal must be in writing and received by the Vice President’s Office within five (5) working days of the receipt by the organization of the written decision of the Board.  The decision of the Vice President will be reviewed by the President of the College before it is issued in writing to the organization’s representatives.

It is expected that the organization representatives making the appeal will meet with the Vice President after submitting their written appeal.  The Vice President may uphold the conduct sanction or take a lesser action.  The conduct sanction may not be increased in the appeals process.  The conduct action taken by the Board will not be implemented until the appeal process is concluded.

If the Vice President is not available to hear an appeal or was involved in initiating charges against the organization, the President of the College will select another administrative officer to hear the appeal.

An organization that fails to fulfill or implement a Board’s conduct action or an action decided on appeal will lose its recognition.

Organizations and advisors are given copies of these procedures at the time they are notified of a conduct review.  The College administration may at its discretion make public the charges against the organization and the final conduct penalties imposed by this procedure.

The College retains the right to move forward with this procedure if the charged organization does not participate in a timely manner.

(* Recognition is a formal process by which student social, academic, fraternal and service organizations are allowed to function by the College.)

Open Flame Policy  

This policy is applicable to faculty, staff, students and contractors. The use of fire, incense and similar open flame producing items such as torches and welding equipment, shall be prohibited in all campus buildings except as described below:

  1. Flames used for commercial cooking in areas operated by the Campus Auxiliary Service (CAS). 
  2. Votive decorations used by CAS during catering events must meet the NYS Fire Code requirements. 
  3. The Physics metal working shop, facilities garage, welding shop, heating plant tool room and the ISC zone shop for maintenance purposes.
  4. In residence halls, for religious purposes in lounge areas only, candelabras must be fastened down to prevent tipping and wax must be prevented from dripping on combustible or flammable items.  Contact Dean of Residential Living for more specific requirements (245-5726). 
  5. Theatrical performances must comply with the NYS Fire Code and be reviewed and approved by the Code Compliance Manager or designee at least three days prior to the performance.
  6. Faculty research and academic instruction which normally use open flames as part of their curriculum in properly equipped areas.

All approved open flames must be kept a safe distance away from flammable and combustible material.  In addition, a fire extinguisher and a person trained in its use must be readily available.  Uses of open flames, other than above, must be approved by the Code Compliance Manager or designee on a case by case basis (245-5662).  A hot work permit must be issued for all uses of open flames (including welding, cutting and soldering) for activities not described above. 

Policy Statement on Sexual Harassment

SUNY Geneseo seeks to create and maintain an educational environment in which all members of the College community are free to pursue their educational goals.  Harassment on the basis of sex is violation of the law (Sec. 703 of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act as amended, Title IX Education Amendments of 1972, and the New York State Human Rights Law) and will not be tolerated in the Campus community of SUNY Geneseo.  The College will not condone actions and words that a reasonable person would regard as sexually harassing.  It is the responsibility of every administrator, supervisor and faculty member to create and maintain an environment that is free of discrimination and allows full access and opportunity for participation to all members of the College community.

Sexual harassment is defined as any unwelcome sexual attention, unwanted verbal or physical sexual advance, request for sexual favors, sexually explicit derogatory statement, or sexually discriminatory remark made by someone within the College Community, which is offensive or objectionable to the recipient (including causing discomfort and humiliation), and when:

1.     submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual’s employment, education, or grade;

2.     submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for academic or employment decisions affecting the individual;

3.     such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s academic or work performance; or

4.     such conduct has the purpose or effect of creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive employment or educational environment.

Sometimes people who are being harassed feel that if they ignore the problem it will go away.  The truth is, the situation could continue or get worse.  Sexual harassment can substantially interfere with a student’s education.

SUNY Geneseo regards sexual harassment as particularly reprehensible and a violation of the standards of conduct required of all persons associated with this institution.  Accordingly, those individuals inflicting such behavior on others are subject to institutional action.

The National Advisory Council on Women’s Educational Programs has identified five categories of sexual harassment.  They are:

1.   generalized sexist remarks or behaviors which include: indicating one sex is not as capable as the other, telling off-color jokes, making suggestive comments, leering, ogling;

2.   inappropriate and offensive sexual advances that are often accompanied by suggestive remarks and/or touching;

3.   sexual activity or other sex-related behavior is solicited (usually very subtly) with promise of reward such as higher grades;

4.   coercion for sexual activity by threat of punishment such as a lower grade, failing a course, negative recommendations and even jeopardizing the future career of the person; and

5.   sexual crimes and misdemeanors, including indecent exposure, sexual fondling, request for intercourse and rape.

In addition to protecting students from sexual harassment, the College is also interested in protecting the academic freedom of students and faculty.  Given our nature as an educational community, the topic of sexual harassment may be discussed within the classroom.  Thus, faculty members have the right to “without limitation, discuss their own subject in the classroom.”  However, the right is not without limitation as the faculty member is not empowered to discuss “controversial matter which has no relation to their subject.”

Both employees and students alleging harassment may use the SUNY Discrimination Grievance Procedure for review of their allegations.  Should disciplinary/conduct action be found necessary, the appropriate procedure applicable under present collective bargaining agreements or campus student conduct regulations will be used.

Students who believe they may be experiencing sexual harassment (whether it is student-student or faculty/staff-student) may be uncertain that specific actions constitute sexual harassment, so College policy allows for two procedural stages.  The first stage provides students with advice and counsel and is strictly confidential.  The second stage involves a formal investigation, which proceeds only if the student is willing to sign a written complaint (which may be made available to the accused).

The procedures for dealing with sexual harassment are as follows:

First Stage

1.   Students are urged to bring questions about procedure or seek informal confidential advice relating to sexual harassment to the Dean of Students (College Union 354; x5706) or the Affirmative Action Officer (Erwin 11E; x5020).  If an individual desires to discuss personal thoughts and feelings, wishes to consider ways to deal individually with the incident(s), or explore procedural options, the Dean’s or the Affirmative Action Office offers counseling and appropriate referral.

2.   Specific complaints of sexual harassment should be made to the Dean of Students (or designee).  In some cases, the Dean of Students may discuss concerns with the person complained against without formal charges being filed.

Second Stage

3.   If a student requests a formal investigation of the incident(s), a written complaint signed by the student identifying the accused individual(s) and the unwanted behavior should be submitted to the Dean of Students.  If the student declines to file a written request, the investigation will not proceed and no copy of the complaint retained.  Except as required by the demands of the investigation and enforcement of policy, the matter will be treated confidentially by the College.  Failure to cooperate with the investigation, retaliation in any form against the complainant, or breach of confidentiality will be independent grounds for institutional action.

4.  Should disciplinary/conduct action be found necessary, the appropriate procedure applicable under present collective bargaining agreements or campus student conduct regulations will be used.

(a) In cases of student-student harassment, investigation and charges will be handled through the Student Code of Conduct and the Campus Conduct System.  Procedures and due process rights afforded students will be governed by the Student Code of Conduct.  Students are encouraged to refer to the Code of Conduct for the specific procedures and guidelines that govern Geneseo student conduct proceedings.

(b) In faculty/staff-student cases, the Dean will forward a copy of the signed complaint to the appropriate labor relations manager.

The Dean (or designee) determines if the complaint falls under the provisions of the Sexual Harassment Policy and if the facts presented in the case warrant investigation.

 The College will take prompt and appropriate remedial action, which may include disciplinary/conduct action against a faculty member, student or employee found in violation.  The College will also respond to any attempt to retaliate against a student complainant and will provide for third-party evaluation of course performance when appropriate.

5.   If the Dean (or designee) determines that the alleged facts presented in the complaint do not warrant investigation, the student will be so informed.  The student may provide additional evidence.  If the complaint is concluded at that stage, no copy of the complaint is retained.

The use of these procedures is strongly encouraged for any person who believes that he/she has been a victim of sexual harassment.  Any complaint should be submitted as soon as possible.  For student-student harassment, the deadline for filing a complaint is no later than six months after the event takes place.  The Dean of Students may waive the six-month limitation when a late submission is reasonable, as determined by the Dean of Students.  Faculty/staff-student harassment complaints should also be made as soon as possible, but in no case more than one year after the alleged harassment has occurred.

Filing a complaint with the University does not preclude a grievant from filing with outside enforcement agencies, such as the EEOC, the State Division of Human Rights, or the Office for Civil Rights of the United States Department of Education.

For further information, contact the Dean of Students Office at 245-5706.

Investigation of Violent Felony Offenses and Missing Students

The University Police Department should be notified of any violent felony offense occurring on campus property.  Members of the college community are asked to immediately report all suspected violent felony offenses, including (but not limited to) murder, manslaughter, sodomy, aggravated sexual abuse, assault, burglary, robbery, arson, and criminal possession of a dangerous weapon.  University Police officers work closely with local, state and federal law enforcement agencies and college officials to gather and share as much information as possible with victims, families and the public.  Victims and witnesses of crimes or other traumatic incidents are encouraged to seek assistance by visiting the Lauderdale Center for Student Health and Counseling at (585) 245-5716; or by contacting the Livingston County Crime and Victim Witness Assistance Coordinator at (585) 243-7020.  Information shared with college counseling officials is not released without the client’s written consent unless there is fear for safety to the client or to someone else.

In cases of a missing person complaint, a police investigation is initiated when there is no reasonable explanation for a person’s absence.  University Police should be immediately notified of all missing person reports for students residing both on and off campus.  The College provides students with the ability to designate an individual for the institution to contact within 24 hours of the student being reported missing, and provide students with the means to register confidential contact information in the event they are missing longer than 24 hours.  If the student resides on campus and is missing for longer than 24 hours, the College is required to notify the contacts listed by the student. In cases of an unemancipated student under 18 years of age, the College is required to notify a custodial parent or guardian within 24 hours of the student being determined to be missing.   If a student resides off campus and is missing for more than 24 hours, the Chief of University Police will notify the appropriate law enforcement agency within 24 hours after the student is determined to be missing.  The NYS Office of Forensic and Victim Services Missing Person Data Collection Guide is used to gather valuable information when handling missing person’s cases.

Visitation Privileges


Students required to leave the College for nonacademic reasons may visit the campus only if they obtain permission from the Dean of Students. Withdrawn or academically dismissed students have ordinary visitors privileges for brief visits and may seek permission from the Dean of Students for extended use of facilities. Individuals who violate state law or college policy may be restricted from visiting all or part of the campus, and will be notified of that restriction in writing by the Dean of Students.

Village of Geneseo

Summary of Village of Geneseo Codes Governing Alcohol
-See SUNY Geneseo Policy on Alcohol and Illicit Drugs

Noise Ordinance
The Geneseo Village Board would like to remind Village residents of some provisions of the "Noise Ordinance":

1. TVs, radios, CDs, and similar devices are not to be played in such a manner as to be heard more than 60 feet away from the source OR beyond any property line.
2. Any unnecessary noise from ANY SOURCE is prohibited between 11 pm and 7 am.
3. Outdoor events which have the potential for excess noise must have a permit obtainable from the Village Clerk. The Village Board reviews all Noise Permit applications and issues the permits. Because the Board meets only every other week, the application must be submitted well in advance of an event in order to have it reviewed.

Full text of prior Ordinance may be obtained from the Geneseo Village Clerk's office, 119 Main Street, Geneseo, NY.

Parking Guidelines
1. No parking from 2 am to 7 am on any street, highway, alleyway, boulevard or public place, except the municipal lot.
2. No parking on front lawn or boulevard (row between sidewalk and street) or over any sidewalk in such a manner as to interfere with use of the sidewalk. Parking or storage of vehicles on lawns or unimproved areas shall not be permitted on any property.
3. Parking meters on Main Street and Center Street may be used for a maximum of 1 or 2 hours. (25 cents per hour) At the end of the 1 or 2 hours, the vehicle must be moved or it will be ticketed.
4. The Village's municipal lot has several different areas: 2-hour parking, permit parking only, handicapped parking, and "No 24-hour". No vehicle in the municipal lot may be parked in the same location more than 24 hours. Permit parking was created for Main Street area merchants and their employees in order to keep the metered spaces in front of the businesses for customers and clients.

Pets
There is an expectation that dog owners will always keep their animals on a leash and will clean up after their pets, especially on public property.

Additional laws and ordinances, including Advertising, and Property Maintenance, as well as the full-text of the above local laws, are included in Appendix C.